Lipid-induced degradation in biocompatible poly(Styrene-Isobutylene-Styrene) (SIBS) thermoplastic elastomer

Mauro Fittipaldi, Landon R Grace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The thermoplastic elastomer Poly(Styrene-block-Isobutylene-block-Styrene) (SIBS) is highly biocompatible, which has led to its use in several commercially-available implants. However, lipid-induced degradation has been previously identified as a primary cause of failure in long-term SIBS implants subject to mechanical loading. Thus, understanding the mechanisms and extent of lipid-induced damage and the role of styrene-isobutylene ratio and molecular weight is critical to improving longevity of SIBS-based implants in order to fully exploit the biocompatibility advantages. Samples of four different SIBS formulations were fabricated via compression molding, immersed to lipid saturation contents from 5 to 80% by weight, and tested in uniaxial tension, stress relaxation, and dynamic creep modes. Degradation mechanisms were investigated via infrared spectroscopy, chromatography, and microscopy. No evidence of lipid-induced chemical interactions or chain scissoring was observed. However, a decrease in tensile strength, loss of dynamic creep performance and faster relaxation with increasing lipid content is attributed to strong internal straining. The magnitude of these losses is inversely proportional to both molecular weight and styrene content, suggesting that selection of these variables during the design phase should be based not only on the mechanical requirements of the application, but the expected degree of lipid exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)80-87
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
Volume68
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thermoplastic elastomers
Styrene
Lipids
Degradation
Creep
Molecular weight
isobutylene
Compression molding
Stress relaxation
Chromatography
Biocompatibility
Infrared spectroscopy
Microscopic examination
Tensile strength

Keywords

  • Biocompatible
  • Degradation
  • Diffusion
  • Lipids
  • Polymer
  • Relaxation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Lipid-induced degradation in biocompatible poly(Styrene-Isobutylene-Styrene) (SIBS) thermoplastic elastomer. / Fittipaldi, Mauro; Grace, Landon R.

In: Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials, Vol. 68, 01.04.2017, p. 80-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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