Linear equations and rap battles: how students in a wired classroom utilized the computer as a resource to coordinate personal and mathematical positional identities in hybrid spaces

Jennifer Langer-Osuna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper draws on the constructs of hybridity, figured worlds, and cultural capital to examine how a group of African-American students in a technology-driven, project-based algebra classroom utilized the computer as a resource to coordinate personal and mathematical positional identities during group work. Analyses of several vignettes of small group dynamics highlight how hybridity was established as the students engaged in multiple on-task and off-task computer-based activities, each of which drew on different lived experiences and forms of cultural capital. The paper ends with a discussion on how classrooms that make use of student-led collaborative work, and where students are afforded autonomy, have the potential to support the academic engagement of students from historically marginalized communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-64
Number of pages14
JournalMathematics Education Research Journal
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Equity
  • Hybridity
  • Identity
  • Mathematics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mathematics(all)
  • Education

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