Life-course exposure to early socioeconomic environment, education in relation to late-life cognitive function among older Mexicans and Mexican Americans

Adina Zeki Al Hazzouri, Mary N. Haan, Sandro Galea, Allison E. Aiello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the associations between life-course education and late-life cognitive function along with the modifying role of migration history. Method: The combined sample includes 1,789 participants from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging and 5,253 participants from the Mexican Health and Aging Study. Aged 60+ at baseline, participants were classified as Mexican residents, Mexicans-return migrants, Mexicans-immigrants to the United States, and Mexicans-U.S. born. Cognitive function was measured using standardized z scores of a short-term verbal recall test. Multivariate linear regression analysis was conducted. Results: Participants' z scores were higher among those whose mother had more than elementary education (β = 0.28, p <.05). Participant's education mediated this association. For 5-year difference in education, the cognitive z score increased by 0.3 points for a U.S. born. Results were similar with father's education. Discussion: Adult educational attainment mediates the effect of childhood socioeconomic status on late-life cognition. Migration plays a role in shaping cognitive aging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1027-1049
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Mexican Americans
  • cognition
  • education
  • health
  • life course
  • old age

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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