LGL leukemia and HTLV

Anish Thomas, Raisa Perzova, Lynn Abbott, Patricia Benz, Michael J. Poiesz, Syamalima Dube, Thomas Loughran, Jorge Ferrer, William Sheremata, Jordan Glaser, Matilde Leon-Ponte, Bernard J. Poiesz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Samples were obtained from 53 large granular lymphocytic leukemia (LGLL) patients and 10,000 volunteer blood donors (VBD). Sera were screened in an HTLV-1 enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and further analyzed in peptide-specific Western blots (WB). DNAs were analyzed by HTLV-1, -2, -3, and -4-specific PCR. Forty four percent of LGLL patients vs. 0.12 % of VBD had anti-HTLV antibodies via EIA (p < 0.001). WB and PCR revealed that four LGLL patients (7.5%) vs. one VBD patient (0.01%) were infected with HTLV-2 (p < 0.001), suggesting an HTLV-2 etiology in a minority of cases. No LGLL patient was positive for HTLV-1, -3, or -4, whereas only one EIA-positive VBD was positive for HTLV-1 and none for HTLV-3 or -4. The HTLV EIA-positive, PCR-negative LGLL patients' sera reacted to epitopes within HTLV p24 gag and gp21 env. Other then the PTLV/BLV viruses, human endogenous retroviral element HERV K10 was the only sequence homologous to these two HTLV peptides, raising the possibility of cross-reactivity. Although three LGLL patients (5.7%) vs. none of 110 VBD patients tested positive for antibodies to the homologous HERV K10 peptide (p = 0.03), the significance of the anti-HTLV seroreactivity observed in many LGLL patients remains unclear. Interestingly, out of 36 HTLV-1-positive control subjects, 3 (8%) (p = 0.014) were positive for antibodies to HERV K10; all three had myelopathy. Out of 64 HTLV-2-positive control subjects 16 (25%) (p = <0.001) were positive for HERV K10 antibodies, and 4 (6%) of these had myelopathy. Out of 22 subjects with either HTLV-1 or -2 myelopathy, 7 (31.8%) were positive for HERV K10 antibodies, and out of 72 HTLV-infected subjects without myelopathy, 12 (16.7%) were positive for anti-HERV K10 antibodies (p = 0.11). The prevalence of anti-HERV K10 antibodies in these populations and the clinical implications thereof need to be pursued further.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-40
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Research and Human Retroviruses
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia
Endogenous Retroviruses
Human T-lymphotropic virus 1
Human T-lymphotropic virus 2
Blood Donors
Spinal Cord Diseases
Volunteers
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Human T-lymphotropic virus 3
Antibodies
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Peptides
Deltaretrovirus Antibodies
Western Blotting
Bovine Leukemia Virus
Sequence Homology
Serum
Epitopes
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Thomas, A., Perzova, R., Abbott, L., Benz, P., Poiesz, M. J., Dube, S., ... Poiesz, B. J. (2010). LGL leukemia and HTLV. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, 26(1), 33-40. https://doi.org/10.1089/aid.2009.0124

LGL leukemia and HTLV. / Thomas, Anish; Perzova, Raisa; Abbott, Lynn; Benz, Patricia; Poiesz, Michael J.; Dube, Syamalima; Loughran, Thomas; Ferrer, Jorge; Sheremata, William; Glaser, Jordan; Leon-Ponte, Matilde; Poiesz, Bernard J.

In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, Vol. 26, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 33-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thomas, A, Perzova, R, Abbott, L, Benz, P, Poiesz, MJ, Dube, S, Loughran, T, Ferrer, J, Sheremata, W, Glaser, J, Leon-Ponte, M & Poiesz, BJ 2010, 'LGL leukemia and HTLV', AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 33-40. https://doi.org/10.1089/aid.2009.0124
Thomas A, Perzova R, Abbott L, Benz P, Poiesz MJ, Dube S et al. LGL leukemia and HTLV. AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 2010 Jan 1;26(1):33-40. https://doi.org/10.1089/aid.2009.0124
Thomas, Anish ; Perzova, Raisa ; Abbott, Lynn ; Benz, Patricia ; Poiesz, Michael J. ; Dube, Syamalima ; Loughran, Thomas ; Ferrer, Jorge ; Sheremata, William ; Glaser, Jordan ; Leon-Ponte, Matilde ; Poiesz, Bernard J. / LGL leukemia and HTLV. In: AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. 2010 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 33-40.
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