Lean, but not obese, fat is enriched for a unique population of regulatory T cells that affect metabolic parameters

Markus Feuerer, Laura Herrero, Daniela Cipolletta, Afia Naaz, Jamie Wong, Ali Nayer, Jongsoon Lee, Allison B. Goldfine, Christophe Benoist, Steven Shoelson, Diane Mathis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1084 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Obesity is accompanied by chronic, low-grade inflammation of adipose tissue, which promotes insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes. These findings raise the question of how fat inflammation can escape the powerful armamentarium of cells and molecules normally responsible for guarding against a runaway immune response. CD4+ Foxp3+ T regulatory (T(reg)) cells with a unique phenotype were highly enriched in the abdominal fat of normal mice, but their numbers were strikingly and specifically reduced at this site in insulin-resistant models of obesity. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments revealed that these T(reg) cells influenced the inflammatory state of adipose tissue and, thus, insulin resistance. Cytokines differentially synthesized by fat-resident regulatory and conventional T cells directly affected the synthesis of inflammatory mediators and glucose uptake by cultured adipocytes. These observations suggest that harnessing the anti-inflammatory properties of T(reg) cells to inhibit elements of the metabolic syndrome may have therapeutic potential.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)930-939
Number of pages10
JournalNature Medicine
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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T-cells
Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Fats
Insulin
Tissue
Population
Insulin Resistance
Adipose Tissue
Obesity
Medical problems
Inflammation
Homeless Youth
Abdominal Fat
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Adipocytes
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Cytokines
Glucose
Molecules
Phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Feuerer, M., Herrero, L., Cipolletta, D., Naaz, A., Wong, J., Nayer, A., ... Mathis, D. (2009). Lean, but not obese, fat is enriched for a unique population of regulatory T cells that affect metabolic parameters. Nature Medicine, 15(8), 930-939. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2002

Lean, but not obese, fat is enriched for a unique population of regulatory T cells that affect metabolic parameters. / Feuerer, Markus; Herrero, Laura; Cipolletta, Daniela; Naaz, Afia; Wong, Jamie; Nayer, Ali; Lee, Jongsoon; Goldfine, Allison B.; Benoist, Christophe; Shoelson, Steven; Mathis, Diane.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 8, 01.08.2009, p. 930-939.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feuerer, M, Herrero, L, Cipolletta, D, Naaz, A, Wong, J, Nayer, A, Lee, J, Goldfine, AB, Benoist, C, Shoelson, S & Mathis, D 2009, 'Lean, but not obese, fat is enriched for a unique population of regulatory T cells that affect metabolic parameters', Nature Medicine, vol. 15, no. 8, pp. 930-939. https://doi.org/10.1038/nm.2002
Feuerer, Markus ; Herrero, Laura ; Cipolletta, Daniela ; Naaz, Afia ; Wong, Jamie ; Nayer, Ali ; Lee, Jongsoon ; Goldfine, Allison B. ; Benoist, Christophe ; Shoelson, Steven ; Mathis, Diane. / Lean, but not obese, fat is enriched for a unique population of regulatory T cells that affect metabolic parameters. In: Nature Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 15, No. 8. pp. 930-939.
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