LD status and achievement: confounding variables in the study of children's social status, self-esteem, and behavioral functioning.

A. M. La Greca, W. L. Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of achievement in explaining the poor social and behavioral functioning associated with LD status, and to evaluate potential gender differences in patterns of interpersonal functioning among youth with learning disabilities (LD) and nondisabled (NLD) youth. Thirty-two students with learning disabilities (21 boys, 11 girls) were matched with same-sex, same-race classmates whose reading achievement was low (LA) or average (AA), and these groups were compared on peer ratings of liking and disliking, perceptions of self-worth and social acceptance, and teacher ratings of conduct problems, anxiety-withdrawal, and attention problems. Students with learning disabilities were less accepted and less well-liked than children in the LA or AA groups and also perceived their self-worth and social acceptance to be lower than LA or AA students. Group by Sex interactions were apparent for several of the peer rating and behavioral variables, indicating that different patterns of social and behavioral functioning distinguished LD boys and LD girls from their NLD peers. The findings highlight the potential role of low achievement in peers' dislike of LD girls and suggest the importance of investigating well-defined subgroups of youth with LD in future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)483-490
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of learning disabilities
Volume23
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Education
  • Health Professions(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'LD status and achievement: confounding variables in the study of children's social status, self-esteem, and behavioral functioning.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this