Latino sexual minority men’s intersectional minority stress, general stress, and coping during COVID-19: A rapid qualitative study

Audrey Harkness, Elliott R. Weinstein, Pranusha Atuluru, Daniel Hernandez Altamirano, Ronald Vidal, Carlos E. Rodriguez-Diaz, Steven A. Safren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Sexual minority men face mental health, substance use, and HIV disparities, all of which can be understood by minority stress and intersectionality theories. With the emergence of COVID-19 and considering its disproportionate impact on Latinx and sexual minority communities, Latino sexual minority men (LSMM) may be facing unique consequences of this new pandemic that intersect with pre-COVID disparities. The purpose of the current study is to explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on LSMM’s intersectional minority stress, general stress, and coping, filling a gap in the current literature. Methods: The current rapid qualitative study explores the impact of COVID-19 on LSMM in South Florida who reported being HIV-negative (N = 10) or living with HIV (N = 10). Results: The rapid analysis revealed themes of exacerbated intersectional minority stress and general stress in the context of COVID-19, some of which was related to the impact of pre-COVID-19 disparities in the LSMM community. Participants reported a variety of coping responses, some of which participants found helpful and others (e.g., substance use) which further exacerbated disparities. Conclusion: The findings underscore the need to scale up and disseminate behavioral health resources to LSMM to address the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on this community’s health and well-being.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • coping
  • COVID-19
  • Latino sexual minority men
  • minority stress
  • rapid qualitative analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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