Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion Revisited: Complication Avoidance and Outcomes with the Mini-Open Approach

Jonathan N. Sellin, G. Damian Brusko, Allan D Levi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To discuss lessons learned from an initial lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) experience with a focus on evolving surgical technique, complication avoidance, and new motor and sensory outcomes after implementation of a modified surgical approach. Methods: A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected series of all patients undergoing LLIF by the senior author (A.D.L.) from January 2010 to January 2018 after implementation of a modified surgical mini-open technique, compared with previously reported institutional results with the originally recommended percutaneous technique. LLIF-specific complications examined included groin/thigh sensory dysfunction, flank bulge/pseudohernia, psoas-pattern weakness, and femoral nerve injury. Results: The incidence (19%, n = 98 patients) of groin/thigh sensory dysfunction in our cohort was significantly lower than that of the historical control (60%, n = 59) (P < 0.0001). The incidence of abdominal flank bulge/pseudohernia (2.0%, n = 98 patients) in our cohort was improved but not significantly lower than that of the historical control (4.2%, n = 118) (P = 0.36). The incidence of psoas-pattern weakness (3.1%, n = 98) in our cohort was significantly lower than that of the historical control (23.7%, n = 59) (P = 0.0001). The incidence of femoral nerve injury (0%, n = 98 patients) in our cohort was improved but was not significantly lower than that of the historical control (1.7%, n = 118) (P = 0.20). Conclusions: The adoption of an exclusive mini-open muscle-splitting approach with first-look inspection of the lumbosacral plexus nerve elements may improve motor and sensory outcomes in general and the incidence of postoperative groin/thigh sensory dysfunction and psoas-pattern weakness in particular.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Groin
Thigh
Incidence
Femoral Nerve
Lumbosacral Plexus
Wounds and Injuries
Activities of Daily Living
Muscles

Keywords

  • Complication avoidance
  • Lateral lumbar interbody fusion
  • Mini-open technique
  • Motor and sensory outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion Revisited : Complication Avoidance and Outcomes with the Mini-Open Approach. / Sellin, Jonathan N.; Brusko, G. Damian; Levi, Allan D.

In: World Neurosurgery, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To discuss lessons learned from an initial lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) experience with a focus on evolving surgical technique, complication avoidance, and new motor and sensory outcomes after implementation of a modified surgical approach. Methods: A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected series of all patients undergoing LLIF by the senior author (A.D.L.) from January 2010 to January 2018 after implementation of a modified surgical mini-open technique, compared with previously reported institutional results with the originally recommended percutaneous technique. LLIF-specific complications examined included groin/thigh sensory dysfunction, flank bulge/pseudohernia, psoas-pattern weakness, and femoral nerve injury. Results: The incidence (19{\%}, n = 98 patients) of groin/thigh sensory dysfunction in our cohort was significantly lower than that of the historical control (60{\%}, n = 59) (P < 0.0001). The incidence of abdominal flank bulge/pseudohernia (2.0{\%}, n = 98 patients) in our cohort was improved but not significantly lower than that of the historical control (4.2{\%}, n = 118) (P = 0.36). The incidence of psoas-pattern weakness (3.1{\%}, n = 98) in our cohort was significantly lower than that of the historical control (23.7{\%}, n = 59) (P = 0.0001). The incidence of femoral nerve injury (0{\%}, n = 98 patients) in our cohort was improved but was not significantly lower than that of the historical control (1.7{\%}, n = 118) (P = 0.20). Conclusions: The adoption of an exclusive mini-open muscle-splitting approach with first-look inspection of the lumbosacral plexus nerve elements may improve motor and sensory outcomes in general and the incidence of postoperative groin/thigh sensory dysfunction and psoas-pattern weakness in particular.",
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N2 - Objective: To discuss lessons learned from an initial lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) experience with a focus on evolving surgical technique, complication avoidance, and new motor and sensory outcomes after implementation of a modified surgical approach. Methods: A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected series of all patients undergoing LLIF by the senior author (A.D.L.) from January 2010 to January 2018 after implementation of a modified surgical mini-open technique, compared with previously reported institutional results with the originally recommended percutaneous technique. LLIF-specific complications examined included groin/thigh sensory dysfunction, flank bulge/pseudohernia, psoas-pattern weakness, and femoral nerve injury. Results: The incidence (19%, n = 98 patients) of groin/thigh sensory dysfunction in our cohort was significantly lower than that of the historical control (60%, n = 59) (P < 0.0001). The incidence of abdominal flank bulge/pseudohernia (2.0%, n = 98 patients) in our cohort was improved but not significantly lower than that of the historical control (4.2%, n = 118) (P = 0.36). The incidence of psoas-pattern weakness (3.1%, n = 98) in our cohort was significantly lower than that of the historical control (23.7%, n = 59) (P = 0.0001). The incidence of femoral nerve injury (0%, n = 98 patients) in our cohort was improved but was not significantly lower than that of the historical control (1.7%, n = 118) (P = 0.20). Conclusions: The adoption of an exclusive mini-open muscle-splitting approach with first-look inspection of the lumbosacral plexus nerve elements may improve motor and sensory outcomes in general and the incidence of postoperative groin/thigh sensory dysfunction and psoas-pattern weakness in particular.

AB - Objective: To discuss lessons learned from an initial lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) experience with a focus on evolving surgical technique, complication avoidance, and new motor and sensory outcomes after implementation of a modified surgical approach. Methods: A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected series of all patients undergoing LLIF by the senior author (A.D.L.) from January 2010 to January 2018 after implementation of a modified surgical mini-open technique, compared with previously reported institutional results with the originally recommended percutaneous technique. LLIF-specific complications examined included groin/thigh sensory dysfunction, flank bulge/pseudohernia, psoas-pattern weakness, and femoral nerve injury. Results: The incidence (19%, n = 98 patients) of groin/thigh sensory dysfunction in our cohort was significantly lower than that of the historical control (60%, n = 59) (P < 0.0001). The incidence of abdominal flank bulge/pseudohernia (2.0%, n = 98 patients) in our cohort was improved but not significantly lower than that of the historical control (4.2%, n = 118) (P = 0.36). The incidence of psoas-pattern weakness (3.1%, n = 98) in our cohort was significantly lower than that of the historical control (23.7%, n = 59) (P = 0.0001). The incidence of femoral nerve injury (0%, n = 98 patients) in our cohort was improved but was not significantly lower than that of the historical control (1.7%, n = 118) (P = 0.20). Conclusions: The adoption of an exclusive mini-open muscle-splitting approach with first-look inspection of the lumbosacral plexus nerve elements may improve motor and sensory outcomes in general and the incidence of postoperative groin/thigh sensory dysfunction and psoas-pattern weakness in particular.

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KW - Mini-open technique

KW - Motor and sensory outcomes

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