Lack of a persistent reduction in serum lipid and apoprotein levels in insulin-dependent diabetic patients receiving intensified insulin treatment

Ronald B Goldberg, Michael L. Reeves, Deborah E. Seigler, Edward A. Ryan, Nadine Miller, Sung L. Hsia, Jay S Skyler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Type I insulin-dependent diabetic patients have an increased risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease that may be determined in part by their tendency to develop circulating lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities. The occurrence of such findings in asymptomatic ambulant Type I patients with mild or moderate hyperglycemia might suggest that conventional methods of insulin treatment are as inefficient at normalizing lipid abnormalities as they are in achieving euglycemia. It would then be important to ascertain whether intensive methods of insulin treatment effectively normalized lipid levels. Ten insulin-dependent young adult diabetic patients were studied on a conventional insulin treatment regimen and then at two-monthly intervals for a six-month period during which they were managed by three different intensified insulin treatment regimens. Plasma glucose levels improved substantially (p<0.001) after two months of intensified therapy (106±4 mg/dl) and did not change significantly thereafter for the remaining four months of intensified insulin treatment. Apart from a short-lived decrease in total, LDL and HDL-cholesterol after two months of intensified treatment (baseline total triglyceride 116±13 mg/dl, total cholesterol 174±16 mg/dl, HDL-cholesterol 46±3 mg/dl). There were no persistent changes in serum lipids, lipoprotein cholesterol or in levels of their major apoproteins A-I, A-II and B. These findings support the contention that, despite moderate hyperglycemia, conventional insulin treatment may be adequate to maintain normal lipid levels. In such circumstances achievement of euglycemia by intensified insulin therapy leads to little change in circulating lipid and lipoprotein values.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-101
Number of pages9
JournalActa Diabetologica Latina
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 1985

Fingerprint

Apoproteins
Insulin
Lipids
Serum
Therapeutics
Hyperglycemia
HDL Cholesterol
Lipoproteins
Vascular Diseases
LDL Cholesterol
Young Adult
Triglycerides
Cholesterol
Glucose

Keywords

  • Apoproteins
  • HDL
  • Insulin dependent diabetes
  • Intensification of control
  • LDL
  • Lipoprotein cholesterol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Lack of a persistent reduction in serum lipid and apoprotein levels in insulin-dependent diabetic patients receiving intensified insulin treatment. / Goldberg, Ronald B; Reeves, Michael L.; Seigler, Deborah E.; Ryan, Edward A.; Miller, Nadine; Hsia, Sung L.; Skyler, Jay S.

In: Acta Diabetologica Latina, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.04.1985, p. 93-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldberg, Ronald B ; Reeves, Michael L. ; Seigler, Deborah E. ; Ryan, Edward A. ; Miller, Nadine ; Hsia, Sung L. ; Skyler, Jay S. / Lack of a persistent reduction in serum lipid and apoprotein levels in insulin-dependent diabetic patients receiving intensified insulin treatment. In: Acta Diabetologica Latina. 1985 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 93-101.
@article{e2eb7344327b4bf380c51bfd89c9c58b,
title = "Lack of a persistent reduction in serum lipid and apoprotein levels in insulin-dependent diabetic patients receiving intensified insulin treatment",
abstract = "Type I insulin-dependent diabetic patients have an increased risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease that may be determined in part by their tendency to develop circulating lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities. The occurrence of such findings in asymptomatic ambulant Type I patients with mild or moderate hyperglycemia might suggest that conventional methods of insulin treatment are as inefficient at normalizing lipid abnormalities as they are in achieving euglycemia. It would then be important to ascertain whether intensive methods of insulin treatment effectively normalized lipid levels. Ten insulin-dependent young adult diabetic patients were studied on a conventional insulin treatment regimen and then at two-monthly intervals for a six-month period during which they were managed by three different intensified insulin treatment regimens. Plasma glucose levels improved substantially (p<0.001) after two months of intensified therapy (106±4 mg/dl) and did not change significantly thereafter for the remaining four months of intensified insulin treatment. Apart from a short-lived decrease in total, LDL and HDL-cholesterol after two months of intensified treatment (baseline total triglyceride 116±13 mg/dl, total cholesterol 174±16 mg/dl, HDL-cholesterol 46±3 mg/dl). There were no persistent changes in serum lipids, lipoprotein cholesterol or in levels of their major apoproteins A-I, A-II and B. These findings support the contention that, despite moderate hyperglycemia, conventional insulin treatment may be adequate to maintain normal lipid levels. In such circumstances achievement of euglycemia by intensified insulin therapy leads to little change in circulating lipid and lipoprotein values.",
keywords = "Apoproteins, HDL, Insulin dependent diabetes, Intensification of control, LDL, Lipoprotein cholesterol",
author = "Goldberg, {Ronald B} and Reeves, {Michael L.} and Seigler, {Deborah E.} and Ryan, {Edward A.} and Nadine Miller and Hsia, {Sung L.} and Skyler, {Jay S}",
year = "1985",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/BF02590782",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "93--101",
journal = "Acta Diabetologica",
issn = "0940-5429",
publisher = "Casa Editrice II Ponte",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lack of a persistent reduction in serum lipid and apoprotein levels in insulin-dependent diabetic patients receiving intensified insulin treatment

AU - Goldberg, Ronald B

AU - Reeves, Michael L.

AU - Seigler, Deborah E.

AU - Ryan, Edward A.

AU - Miller, Nadine

AU - Hsia, Sung L.

AU - Skyler, Jay S

PY - 1985/4/1

Y1 - 1985/4/1

N2 - Type I insulin-dependent diabetic patients have an increased risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease that may be determined in part by their tendency to develop circulating lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities. The occurrence of such findings in asymptomatic ambulant Type I patients with mild or moderate hyperglycemia might suggest that conventional methods of insulin treatment are as inefficient at normalizing lipid abnormalities as they are in achieving euglycemia. It would then be important to ascertain whether intensive methods of insulin treatment effectively normalized lipid levels. Ten insulin-dependent young adult diabetic patients were studied on a conventional insulin treatment regimen and then at two-monthly intervals for a six-month period during which they were managed by three different intensified insulin treatment regimens. Plasma glucose levels improved substantially (p<0.001) after two months of intensified therapy (106±4 mg/dl) and did not change significantly thereafter for the remaining four months of intensified insulin treatment. Apart from a short-lived decrease in total, LDL and HDL-cholesterol after two months of intensified treatment (baseline total triglyceride 116±13 mg/dl, total cholesterol 174±16 mg/dl, HDL-cholesterol 46±3 mg/dl). There were no persistent changes in serum lipids, lipoprotein cholesterol or in levels of their major apoproteins A-I, A-II and B. These findings support the contention that, despite moderate hyperglycemia, conventional insulin treatment may be adequate to maintain normal lipid levels. In such circumstances achievement of euglycemia by intensified insulin therapy leads to little change in circulating lipid and lipoprotein values.

AB - Type I insulin-dependent diabetic patients have an increased risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease that may be determined in part by their tendency to develop circulating lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities. The occurrence of such findings in asymptomatic ambulant Type I patients with mild or moderate hyperglycemia might suggest that conventional methods of insulin treatment are as inefficient at normalizing lipid abnormalities as they are in achieving euglycemia. It would then be important to ascertain whether intensive methods of insulin treatment effectively normalized lipid levels. Ten insulin-dependent young adult diabetic patients were studied on a conventional insulin treatment regimen and then at two-monthly intervals for a six-month period during which they were managed by three different intensified insulin treatment regimens. Plasma glucose levels improved substantially (p<0.001) after two months of intensified therapy (106±4 mg/dl) and did not change significantly thereafter for the remaining four months of intensified insulin treatment. Apart from a short-lived decrease in total, LDL and HDL-cholesterol after two months of intensified treatment (baseline total triglyceride 116±13 mg/dl, total cholesterol 174±16 mg/dl, HDL-cholesterol 46±3 mg/dl). There were no persistent changes in serum lipids, lipoprotein cholesterol or in levels of their major apoproteins A-I, A-II and B. These findings support the contention that, despite moderate hyperglycemia, conventional insulin treatment may be adequate to maintain normal lipid levels. In such circumstances achievement of euglycemia by intensified insulin therapy leads to little change in circulating lipid and lipoprotein values.

KW - Apoproteins

KW - HDL

KW - Insulin dependent diabetes

KW - Intensification of control

KW - LDL

KW - Lipoprotein cholesterol

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021968109&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0021968109&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/BF02590782

DO - 10.1007/BF02590782

M3 - Article

C2 - 3907233

AN - SCOPUS:0021968109

VL - 22

SP - 93

EP - 101

JO - Acta Diabetologica

JF - Acta Diabetologica

SN - 0940-5429

IS - 2

ER -