Laboratory diagnosis of infection status in infants perinatally exposed to human immunodeficiency virus type 1

Morris O. Paul, Surya Tetali, Martin L. Lesser, Elaine J. Abrams, Xue Ping Wang, Regina Kowalski, Mahrukh Bamji, Barbara Napolitano, Leslie Gulick, Saroj Bakshi, Savita Pahwa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Accurate and timely diagnosis of infection status in infants born to women infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is of paramount importance. The comparative accuracy of five diagnostic decision rules was evaluated in 208 HIV-exposed infants (32 infected, 176 uninfected) based on laboratory testing during the first 6 months of life. Diagnostic rules A and B, which required single blood samples analyzed by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (rule A) or culture, PCR, and p24 antigen detection (rule B) were more prone to incorrect diagnoses than were rules requiring 2 blood samples analyzed by a single assay (rule C) or combinations of culture and PCR (rules D and E). Rule D, which used PCR as the initial test, established the most useful algorithm: a positive PCR result followed by a positive culture in the second sample confirmed infected status, while two consecutive negative PCR results reconfirmed as negative at 6 months of age established uninfected status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)68-76
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume173
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Laboratory diagnosis of infection status in infants perinatally exposed to human immunodeficiency virus type 1'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Paul, M. O., Tetali, S., Lesser, M. L., Abrams, E. J., Wang, X. P., Kowalski, R., Bamji, M., Napolitano, B., Gulick, L., Bakshi, S., & Pahwa, S. (1996). Laboratory diagnosis of infection status in infants perinatally exposed to human immunodeficiency virus type 1. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 173(1), 68-76. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/173.1.68