Knowledge and compliance with medications in South East Asian refugees

A. Lee, D. Buchwald, Thomas Hooton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluated knowledge about prescribed medications and compliance with taking those medications in 96 South East Asian refugees of different ethnic backgrounds seen in a primary care clinic. Two hundred and thirty (88%) of 262 prescribed medications were currently being taken by the patients. Although 97% of the medications were either named or described correctly, the correct rationale for taking the medication was known for only 79% and the correct dosage regimen for only 63%. Thirty-two (33%) of the 96 patients were not taking one or more of their prescribed medications, 17 (18%) were taking one or more medications not prescribed, 5 (5%) were taking duplicate forms of the same medication, and 4 (4%) were taking a medication that had been discontinued by the clinic provider. Seventy-two (75%) patients were taking one or more medications at in incorrect dose. Only 12 (12%) patients were fully compliant with all prescribed medications. We conclude that knowledge about and compliance with medications is a major problem among South East Asian patients attending a primary care refugee clinic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)199-204
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics
Volume18
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Refugees
Medication Adherence
Primary Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Knowledge and compliance with medications in South East Asian refugees. / Lee, A.; Buchwald, D.; Hooton, Thomas.

In: Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.01.1993, p. 199-204.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{73c4716bc7134c3782d3de8e314a4867,
title = "Knowledge and compliance with medications in South East Asian refugees",
abstract = "We evaluated knowledge about prescribed medications and compliance with taking those medications in 96 South East Asian refugees of different ethnic backgrounds seen in a primary care clinic. Two hundred and thirty (88{\%}) of 262 prescribed medications were currently being taken by the patients. Although 97{\%} of the medications were either named or described correctly, the correct rationale for taking the medication was known for only 79{\%} and the correct dosage regimen for only 63{\%}. Thirty-two (33{\%}) of the 96 patients were not taking one or more of their prescribed medications, 17 (18{\%}) were taking one or more medications not prescribed, 5 (5{\%}) were taking duplicate forms of the same medication, and 4 (4{\%}) were taking a medication that had been discontinued by the clinic provider. Seventy-two (75{\%}) patients were taking one or more medications at in incorrect dose. Only 12 (12{\%}) patients were fully compliant with all prescribed medications. We conclude that knowledge about and compliance with medications is a major problem among South East Asian patients attending a primary care refugee clinic.",
author = "A. Lee and D. Buchwald and Thomas Hooton",
year = "1993",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "199--204",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics",
issn = "0269-4727",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Knowledge and compliance with medications in South East Asian refugees

AU - Lee, A.

AU - Buchwald, D.

AU - Hooton, Thomas

PY - 1993/1/1

Y1 - 1993/1/1

N2 - We evaluated knowledge about prescribed medications and compliance with taking those medications in 96 South East Asian refugees of different ethnic backgrounds seen in a primary care clinic. Two hundred and thirty (88%) of 262 prescribed medications were currently being taken by the patients. Although 97% of the medications were either named or described correctly, the correct rationale for taking the medication was known for only 79% and the correct dosage regimen for only 63%. Thirty-two (33%) of the 96 patients were not taking one or more of their prescribed medications, 17 (18%) were taking one or more medications not prescribed, 5 (5%) were taking duplicate forms of the same medication, and 4 (4%) were taking a medication that had been discontinued by the clinic provider. Seventy-two (75%) patients were taking one or more medications at in incorrect dose. Only 12 (12%) patients were fully compliant with all prescribed medications. We conclude that knowledge about and compliance with medications is a major problem among South East Asian patients attending a primary care refugee clinic.

AB - We evaluated knowledge about prescribed medications and compliance with taking those medications in 96 South East Asian refugees of different ethnic backgrounds seen in a primary care clinic. Two hundred and thirty (88%) of 262 prescribed medications were currently being taken by the patients. Although 97% of the medications were either named or described correctly, the correct rationale for taking the medication was known for only 79% and the correct dosage regimen for only 63%. Thirty-two (33%) of the 96 patients were not taking one or more of their prescribed medications, 17 (18%) were taking one or more medications not prescribed, 5 (5%) were taking duplicate forms of the same medication, and 4 (4%) were taking a medication that had been discontinued by the clinic provider. Seventy-two (75%) patients were taking one or more medications at in incorrect dose. Only 12 (12%) patients were fully compliant with all prescribed medications. We conclude that knowledge about and compliance with medications is a major problem among South East Asian patients attending a primary care refugee clinic.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027285570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027285570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 199

EP - 204

JO - Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics

JF - Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics

SN - 0269-4727

IS - 3

ER -