Knee arthritis pain is reduced and range of motion is increased following moderate pressure massage therapy

Tiffany M Field, Miguel A Diego, Gladys Gonzalez, C. G. Funk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: The literature on massage therapy effects on knee pain suggests that pain was reduced based on self-report, but little is known about range of motion (ROM) effects. Methods: Medical School staff and faculty who had knee arthritis pain were randomly assigned to a moderate pressure massage therapy or a waitlist control group (24 per group). Self-reports included the WOMAC (pain, stiffness and function) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. ROM and ROM-related pain were assessed before and after the last sessions. Results: The massage group showed an immediate post-massage increase in ROM and a decrease in ROM-associated pain. On the last versus the first day of the study, the massage group showed greater increases in ROM and decreases in ROM-related pain as well as less self-reported pain and sleep disturbances than the waitlist control group. Discussion: These data highlight the effectiveness of moderate pressure massage therapy for increasing ROM and lessening ROM-related pain and long-term pain and sleep disturbances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-237
Number of pages5
JournalComplementary Therapies in Clinical Practice
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Keywords

  • Knee arthritis pain
  • Moderate pressure massage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

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