Keratoprosthesis with biocolonizable microporous fluorocarbon haptic

Preliminary results in a 24-patient study

J. M. Legeais, G. Renard, Jean-Marie A Parel, M. Savoldelli, Y. Pouliquen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Most complications of a keratoprosthesis occur at the tissue- to-implant interface. The ideal prosthesis would eliminate this interface by having the tissue actually grow into the supporting material. We present a prospective clinical human study of a novel biocolonizable keratoprosthesis in 24 eyes of 24 patients. Design: To promote implant stability, the 9-mm- diameter haptic was fashioned using a custom-made microporous fluorocarbon with a 4-mm-diameter, 2.67-mm-long, central optic made of medical grade polymethylmethacrylate, giving a global visual field of 110° to 130°. Only bilaterally blind patients with untreatable corneal diseases were included in the study. The haptic was inserted into a lamellar pocket delaminated in the stroma, and the optic was positioned through a hole trephined in the central cornea. Results: The average follow-up was 15.7 months (range, 4 to 28 months). The host corneal fibroblasts penetrated and proliferated into the peripheral microporous fluorocarbon and provided anchorage between the cornea and prosthesis. Seventeen patients (70.8%) had visual acuity improvements. Mean corrected final visual acuity was 20/100 (range, 20/30 to 20/400). Five anatomic failures occurred in the first 6 months (three extrusions, one dislocation of the optic, and one endophthalmitis). We had one case (4.1%) of treatable glaucoma. We successfully removed four of five retroprosthetic membranes that had occurred. No retinal detachment occurred. Conclusion: The biocompatible inert microporous polymer did not eliminate all mechanical complications associated with a keratoprosthesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)757-763
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume113
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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Fluorocarbons
Cornea
Visual Acuity
Prostheses and Implants
Corneal Diseases
Endophthalmitis
Retinal Detachment
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Visual Fields
Glaucoma
Polymers
Fibroblasts
Membranes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Keratoprosthesis with biocolonizable microporous fluorocarbon haptic : Preliminary results in a 24-patient study. / Legeais, J. M.; Renard, G.; Parel, Jean-Marie A; Savoldelli, M.; Pouliquen, Y.

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 113, No. 6, 01.01.1995, p. 757-763.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Legeais, J. M. ; Renard, G. ; Parel, Jean-Marie A ; Savoldelli, M. ; Pouliquen, Y. / Keratoprosthesis with biocolonizable microporous fluorocarbon haptic : Preliminary results in a 24-patient study. In: Archives of Ophthalmology. 1995 ; Vol. 113, No. 6. pp. 757-763.
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