Journal impact factor or intellectual influence? A content analysis of citation use in Communication Monographs and Human Communication Research (2007-2009)

Michael J. Beatty, Thomas Hugh Feeley, Melissa D. Dodd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Journal impact factors typically rely on the number of citations to a journal as well as the number of citable items published in the journal during specific time parameters. If journal impact factors accurately differentiate journals along a quality continuum, journals with higher impact factors should be referenced more often than journals with lower impact factors as sources of influence on scholars' conceptual and methodological approaches to inquiry. To investigate this claim, a sample consisting of all twelve issues of Human Communication Research (HCR) and Communication Monographs (CM) published from 2007 through 2009 were content analyzed and every citation to either journal in the articles appearing in HCR and CM was coded. Results indicated that, despite higher impact factors for HCR, there were not more citations to HCR than CM as sources of conceptual or methodological influence appearing in articles appearing in HCR or CM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)174-176
Number of pages3
JournalPublic Relations Review
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

Keywords

  • Author self-citations
  • Conceptual influence
  • Journal impact factor
  • Methodological influence
  • Utility citations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Marketing

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