John Henry Active Coping, Education, and Blood Pressure among Urban Blacks

Anita F. Fernander, Ron E.F. Durán, Patrice G. Saab, Neil Schneiderman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

The John Henryism hypothesis posits that individuals who actively cope with psychosocial stressors in the face of low socioeconomic resources are more likely to exhibit higher blood pressure levels than those with greater socioeconomic resources. It has been proposed that John Henryism may contribute to the disproportionately high rates of hypertension among blacks. Previous studies which support the John Henryism hypothesis have been conducted among blacks who reside in primarily southern rural settings. However, more recent studies conducted among urban blacks, have yielded contrasting results. This study examined the John Henryism hypothesis in a middle-aged urban sample of blacks in south Florida. The results of the study confirmed that there is indeed a relationship among John Henry Active Coping, years of education, and blood pressure among urban blacks in south Florida. Upon closer examination, higher John Henry Active Coping scores were associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure among higher educated men, and John Henry Active Coping scores were associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure among women with lower levels of education. The findings are discussed in terms of sociocultural factors that may influence the coping styles of black men and women in different communities and environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-255
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume96
Issue number2 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Feb 1 2004

Keywords

  • Blacks
  • Blood pressure
  • Education
  • John Henryism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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