Itch in ethnic populations

Hong Liang Tey, Gil Yosipovitch

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Racial and ethnic differences in the prevalence and clinical characteristics of itch have rarely been studied. The aim of this review is to highlight possible associations between ethnicity and different forms of chronic itch. We provide a current review of the prevalence of different types of itch in ethnic populations. Genetic variation may significantly affect receptors for itch as well as response to anti-pruritic therapies. Primary cutaneous amyloidosis, a type of pruritic dermatosis, is particularly common in Asians and rare in Caucasians and African Americans, and this may relate to a genetic polymorphism in the Interleukin-31 receptor. Pruritus secondary to the use of chloroquine for malaria is a common problem for African patients, but is not commonly reported in other ethnic groups. In patients with primary biliary cirrhosis, pruritus is more common and more severe in African Americans and Hispanics compared with Caucasians. Racial and ethnic differences in itch and its medical care are poorly understood. Research is needed to examine biological, psychosocial, and lifestyle factors that may contribute to these disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-234
Number of pages8
JournalActa Dermato-Venereologica
Volume90
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 17 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pruritus
African Americans
Interleukin Receptors
Biliary Liver Cirrhosis
Chloroquine
Genetic Polymorphisms
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
Skin Diseases
Population
Malaria
Life Style
Psychology
Research
Therapeutics
Primary Cutaneous Amyloidosis

Keywords

  • Asian
  • Black
  • Caucasian
  • Hispanics
  • Pruritus
  • Race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Itch in ethnic populations. / Tey, Hong Liang; Yosipovitch, Gil.

In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, Vol. 90, No. 3, 17.06.2010, p. 227-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Tey, Hong Liang ; Yosipovitch, Gil. / Itch in ethnic populations. In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica. 2010 ; Vol. 90, No. 3. pp. 227-234.
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