It Ain't Over till It's Over: The Case for Offering Relapse-Prevention Interventions to Former Smokers

Thomas H. Brandon, Thaddeus A. Herzog, Monica W Hooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most people who attempt to quit tobacco smoking eventually relapse. Although treatment strategies have been developed to prevent smoking relapse, they tend to be available only to the small proportion of smokers who enroll in intensive smoking cessation treatments. It is argued that freestanding relapse-prevention interventions could be offered to persons who recently ceased smoking, whether they used a formal treatment program or quit on their own. A line of research is described demonstrating that a series of relapse-prevention booklets mailed to recent quitters significantly reduces smoking relapse. Moreover, the intervention seems to be highly cost-effective. If disseminated widely, such an approach has the potential to make a significant public health impact.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-200
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of the Medical Sciences
Volume326
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Secondary Prevention
Smoking
Recurrence
Pamphlets
Withholding Treatment
Smoking Cessation
Public Health
Costs and Cost Analysis
Therapeutics
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

It Ain't Over till It's Over : The Case for Offering Relapse-Prevention Interventions to Former Smokers. / Brandon, Thomas H.; Herzog, Thaddeus A.; Hooper, Monica W.

In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Vol. 326, No. 4, 01.10.2003, p. 197-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brandon, Thomas H. ; Herzog, Thaddeus A. ; Hooper, Monica W. / It Ain't Over till It's Over : The Case for Offering Relapse-Prevention Interventions to Former Smokers. In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences. 2003 ; Vol. 326, No. 4. pp. 197-200.
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