Issues related to symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments affecting cognitive and neuropsychiatric comorbidities of epilepsy

Amy R. Brooks-Kayal, Kevin G. Bath, Anne T. Berg, Aristea S. Galanopoulou, Gregory L. Holmes, Frances E. Jensen, Andres M Kanner, Terence J. O'Brien, Vicky H. Whittemore, Melodie R. Winawer, Manisha Patel, Helen E. Scharfman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many symptoms of neurologic or psychiatric illness-such as cognitive impairment, depression, anxiety, attention deficits, and migraine-occur more frequently in people with epilepsy than in the general population. These diverse comorbidities present an underappreciated problem for people with epilepsy and their caregivers because they decrease quality of life, complicate treatment, and increase mortality. In fact, it has been suggested that comorbidities can have a greater effect on quality of life in people with epilepsy than the seizures themselves. There is increasing recognition of the frequency and impact of cognitive and behavioral comorbidities of epilepsy, highlighted in the 2012 Institute of Medicine report on epilepsy. Comorbidities have also been acknowledged, as a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Benchmark area for research in epilepsy. However, relatively little progress has been made in developing new therapies directed specifically at comorbidities. On the other hand, there have been many advances in understanding underlying mechanisms. These advances have made it possible to identify novel targets for therapy and prevention. As part of the International League Against Epilepsy/American Epilepsy Society workshop on preclinical therapy development for epilepsy, our working group considered the current state of understanding related to terminology, models, and strategies for therapy development for the comorbidities of epilepsy. Herein we summarize our findings and suggest ways to accelerate development of new therapies. We also consider important issues to improve research including those related to methodology, nonpharmacologic therapies, biomarkers, and infrastructure. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)44-60
Number of pages17
JournalEpilepsia
Volume54
Issue numberSUPPL.4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013

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Comorbidity
Epilepsy
Therapeutics
Quality of Life
Benchmarking
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Neurologic Manifestations
Migraine Disorders
Research
Terminology
Caregivers
Psychiatry
Seizures
Anxiety
Biomarkers
Depression
Education
Mortality
Population

Keywords

  • Animal models
  • Biomarkers
  • Comorbidity
  • Epilepsy
  • Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Brooks-Kayal, A. R., Bath, K. G., Berg, A. T., Galanopoulou, A. S., Holmes, G. L., Jensen, F. E., ... Scharfman, H. E. (2013). Issues related to symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments affecting cognitive and neuropsychiatric comorbidities of epilepsy. Epilepsia, 54(SUPPL.4), 44-60. https://doi.org/10.1111/epi.12298

Issues related to symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments affecting cognitive and neuropsychiatric comorbidities of epilepsy. / Brooks-Kayal, Amy R.; Bath, Kevin G.; Berg, Anne T.; Galanopoulou, Aristea S.; Holmes, Gregory L.; Jensen, Frances E.; Kanner, Andres M; O'Brien, Terence J.; Whittemore, Vicky H.; Winawer, Melodie R.; Patel, Manisha; Scharfman, Helen E.

In: Epilepsia, Vol. 54, No. SUPPL.4, 08.2013, p. 44-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brooks-Kayal, AR, Bath, KG, Berg, AT, Galanopoulou, AS, Holmes, GL, Jensen, FE, Kanner, AM, O'Brien, TJ, Whittemore, VH, Winawer, MR, Patel, M & Scharfman, HE 2013, 'Issues related to symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments affecting cognitive and neuropsychiatric comorbidities of epilepsy', Epilepsia, vol. 54, no. SUPPL.4, pp. 44-60. https://doi.org/10.1111/epi.12298
Brooks-Kayal, Amy R. ; Bath, Kevin G. ; Berg, Anne T. ; Galanopoulou, Aristea S. ; Holmes, Gregory L. ; Jensen, Frances E. ; Kanner, Andres M ; O'Brien, Terence J. ; Whittemore, Vicky H. ; Winawer, Melodie R. ; Patel, Manisha ; Scharfman, Helen E. / Issues related to symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments affecting cognitive and neuropsychiatric comorbidities of epilepsy. In: Epilepsia. 2013 ; Vol. 54, No. SUPPL.4. pp. 44-60.
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