Is conservation research money being spent wisely? Changing trends in conservation research priorities

J. T. Stroud, E. Rehm, M. Ladd, P. Olivas, K. J. Feeley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Conservation biology is often defined as a "mission driven crisis discipline", and as such research priorities should ideally parallel the relative importance of different conservation threats. Conservation research has increased exponentially over the last 22 years, rising from <150 articles in 1990 to >4000 articles in 2012. However, this growth has not and may not necessarily reflect changes in research needs. Consequently, it remains uncertain if growth and prioritization have been consistent between research themes, or subdisciplines. In other words, it is unknown if conservation priorities change in relation to research needs, or if instead to shifts in funding, which may or may not correspond to true research needs. Future conservation research priorities should ideally be based on conservation needs alone and must account for threats at both the immediate and long-term scales.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-473
Number of pages3
JournalJournal for Nature Conservation
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Buzzwords
  • Conservation biology
  • Funding
  • NSF
  • Research funding
  • Research priorities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

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