Is community-based work compatible with data collection?

John W Murphy, Berkeley A. Franz, Karen A. Callaghan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although community-based projects have introduced a successful model for addressing many social problems, less consideration has been given to how such projects should be evaluated. This paper considers whether the philosophy underlying community-based practice is compatible with data collection. Specifically at issue is whether empirical indicators are helpful to summarize a project. Although having valid knowledge is important, this paper makes a distinction between merely collecting data versus understanding the course of a project. The key point is that community participation requires a unique perspective on how knowledge is negotiated and interpreted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2
Pages (from-to)9-22
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Sociology and Social Welfare
Volume42
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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community
Social Problems
participation
philosophy

Keywords

  • Community health
  • Community-based philosophy
  • Social theory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Is community-based work compatible with data collection? / Murphy, John W; Franz, Berkeley A.; Callaghan, Karen A.

In: Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, Vol. 42, No. 4, 2, 01.12.2015, p. 9-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Murphy, John W ; Franz, Berkeley A. ; Callaghan, Karen A. / Is community-based work compatible with data collection?. In: Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare. 2015 ; Vol. 42, No. 4. pp. 9-22.
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