Is a science of psychotherapy possible? Subjectivity problems

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Abstract

Two sorts of subjectivity problems are discussed. The 1st concerns the characterization of psychotherapy as an attempt to alter clients' meanings. The 2nd concerns the seemingly subjective nature of value judgments about psychotherapy outcomes. It is argued that despite initial appearances, neither of these problems poses an insuperable difficulty for transforming the discipline of psychotherapy into a genuine science.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1133-1138
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Psychologist
Volume55
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Psychotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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Is a science of psychotherapy possible? Subjectivity problems. / Erwin, Edward.

In: American Psychologist, Vol. 55, No. 10, 01.01.2000, p. 1133-1138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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