Ion transport through charged hydrated tissues by convection and diffusion

Weiyong Gu, J. S. Hou, W. M. Lai, V. C. Mow

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We have recently developed a triphasic constitutive theory to model the swelling and deformational behavior of charged hydrated soft tissues such as cartilage. In this analysis of an uniaxial ultrafiltration experiment using the triphasic theory we show that: 1) drag-induced compression causes a inhomogeneous distribution of the fixed charge density cF; 2) because of the inhomogeneity of cF, the water at the upstream side and faster than water at the down stream side; and 3) due to solid matrix compaction, both water and ion velocities increase with depth. There exists an optimum cF where maximum ion diffusion speed exists at the exit. At very low and very high cF, ions simply move together with solvent by convection. These findings may be important in understanding the physiology of cartilage and ion transport through charged porous-permeable matrices.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED
EditorsSteven A. Goldstein
Place of PublicationNew York, NY, United States
PublisherPubl by ASME
Pages219-222
Number of pages4
Volume17
StatePublished - Dec 1 1990
Externally publishedYes
EventWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers - Dallas, TX, USA
Duration: Nov 25 1990Nov 30 1990

Other

OtherWinter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers
CityDallas, TX, USA
Period11/25/9011/30/90

Fingerprint

Tissue
Ions
Cartilage
Water
Physiology
Ultrafiltration
Charge density
Drag
Swelling
Compaction
Convection
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Gu, W., Hou, J. S., Lai, W. M., & Mow, V. C. (1990). Ion transport through charged hydrated tissues by convection and diffusion. In S. A. Goldstein (Ed.), American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED (Vol. 17, pp. 219-222). New York, NY, United States: Publ by ASME.

Ion transport through charged hydrated tissues by convection and diffusion. / Gu, Weiyong; Hou, J. S.; Lai, W. M.; Mow, V. C.

American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. ed. / Steven A. Goldstein. Vol. 17 New York, NY, United States : Publ by ASME, 1990. p. 219-222.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gu, W, Hou, JS, Lai, WM & Mow, VC 1990, Ion transport through charged hydrated tissues by convection and diffusion. in SA Goldstein (ed.), American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. vol. 17, Publ by ASME, New York, NY, United States, pp. 219-222, Winter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Dallas, TX, USA, 11/25/90.
Gu W, Hou JS, Lai WM, Mow VC. Ion transport through charged hydrated tissues by convection and diffusion. In Goldstein SA, editor, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. Vol. 17. New York, NY, United States: Publ by ASME. 1990. p. 219-222
Gu, Weiyong ; Hou, J. S. ; Lai, W. M. ; Mow, V. C. / Ion transport through charged hydrated tissues by convection and diffusion. American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division (Publication) BED. editor / Steven A. Goldstein. Vol. 17 New York, NY, United States : Publ by ASME, 1990. pp. 219-222
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