Involuntary childlessness and marital adjustment

His and hers

P. M. Ulbrich, A. T. Coyle, Maria Llabre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study of 103 couples in treatment for infertility suggests that spouses are generally similar in the way they perceive their marital adjustment, but that they arrive at their views by different routes. Acceptance of a childless lifestyle is consistently associated with greater marital adjustment for men, but greater stress associated with infertility undermines marital adjustment for both husbands and wives. Men adjust better to an involuntarily childless marriage if their wives are employed or have high earnings. Wife's marital adjustment diminishes with the length of the marriage and the course of treatment for infertility. The stress women experience as a result of infertility influences their perception of their marriage and may undermine their ability to get the support they need during the transition to nonparenthood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-158
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Sex and Marital Therapy
Volume16
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

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childlessness
Social Adjustment
Spouses
wife
marriage
Infertility
Marriage
husband
spouse
acceptance
Aptitude
ability
Life Style
experience
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Involuntary childlessness and marital adjustment : His and hers. / Ulbrich, P. M.; Coyle, A. T.; Llabre, Maria.

In: Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, Vol. 16, No. 3, 01.01.1990, p. 147-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ulbrich, P. M. ; Coyle, A. T. ; Llabre, Maria. / Involuntary childlessness and marital adjustment : His and hers. In: Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy. 1990 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 147-158.
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