Investigating Resilience to Depression in Adults With ADHD

Lauren E. Oddo, Laura E. Knouse, Craig B.H. Surman, Steven Safren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: ADHD is associated with elevated rates of comorbid depressive disorders, yet the nature and development of this comorbidity remain understudied. We hypothesized that a longer period of prior ADHD treatment, being less likely to engage in maladaptive cognitive/behavioral coping strategies, and less severe ADHD symptoms would predict greater likelihood of lifetime resilience to depression. Method: Seventy-seven adults with ADHD completed diagnostic interviews, clinician-administered symptom rating scales, a stressful life events measure, and self-report questionnaires. We used logistic regression analyses to identify factors associated with resilience to depression. Results: Adults with more extensive ADHD treatment histories were more likely to be resilient to depression. Those who were less likely to report ruminative thinking patterns and cognitive-behavioral avoidance were also more resilient. Severity of current or childhood ADHD symptoms and recent negative life events did not predict resilience. Conclusion: Results identify protective factors that may promote the resiliency to ADHD-depression comorbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)497-505
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Attention Disorders
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Depression
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder
Self Report
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Interviews
Surveys and Questionnaires
Protective Factors
Thinking

Keywords

  • adult ADHD
  • depression
  • resilience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Investigating Resilience to Depression in Adults With ADHD. / Oddo, Lauren E.; Knouse, Laura E.; Surman, Craig B.H.; Safren, Steven.

In: Journal of Attention Disorders, Vol. 22, No. 5, 01.03.2018, p. 497-505.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oddo, Lauren E. ; Knouse, Laura E. ; Surman, Craig B.H. ; Safren, Steven. / Investigating Resilience to Depression in Adults With ADHD. In: Journal of Attention Disorders. 2018 ; Vol. 22, No. 5. pp. 497-505.
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