Invertebrates and their roles in coral reef ecosystems

Peter W. Glynn, Ian C. Enochs

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are some fundamental generalizations that can be made about the biology and ecology of invertebrates associated with coral reefs. For example, it is widely accepted that coral reefs support the highest biodiversity of all marine ecosystems, and that invertebrates contribute dominantly to this condition. It is also acknowledged that numerous invertebrate taxa are involved in highly complex and coevolved relationships with metazoans, unicellular protists, and multicellular algae. Further, during the past few decades it has been demonstrated that certain invertebrate consumers can have strong and widespread effects on coral abundances, community structure, and the integrity of reef formations.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCoral Reefs: An Ecosystem in Transition
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages273-325
Number of pages53
ISBN (Print)9789400701137
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Fingerprint

coral reef
invertebrate
ecosystem
reef formation
protist
marine ecosystem
coral
community structure
alga
biodiversity
ecology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Glynn, P. W., & Enochs, I. C. (2011). Invertebrates and their roles in coral reef ecosystems. In Coral Reefs: An Ecosystem in Transition (pp. 273-325). Springer Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-0114-4_18

Invertebrates and their roles in coral reef ecosystems. / Glynn, Peter W.; Enochs, Ian C.

Coral Reefs: An Ecosystem in Transition. Springer Netherlands, 2011. p. 273-325.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Glynn, PW & Enochs, IC 2011, Invertebrates and their roles in coral reef ecosystems. in Coral Reefs: An Ecosystem in Transition. Springer Netherlands, pp. 273-325. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-0114-4_18
Glynn PW, Enochs IC. Invertebrates and their roles in coral reef ecosystems. In Coral Reefs: An Ecosystem in Transition. Springer Netherlands. 2011. p. 273-325 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-0114-4_18
Glynn, Peter W. ; Enochs, Ian C. / Invertebrates and their roles in coral reef ecosystems. Coral Reefs: An Ecosystem in Transition. Springer Netherlands, 2011. pp. 273-325
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