Intraspinal delivery of Schwann cells for spinal cord injury

Andrea J. Santamaría, Juan Solano, Francisco D. Benavides, James D Guest

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cell transplant-mediated tissue repair of the damaged spinal cord is being tested in several clinical trials. The current candidates are neural stem cells, stromal cells, and autologous Schwann cells (aSC). Due to their peripheral origin and limited penetration of astrocytic regions, aSC are transplanted intralesionally as compared to neural stem cells that are transplanted into intact spinal cord. Injections into either location can cause iatrogenic injury, and thus technical precision is important in the therapeutic risk-benefit equation. In this chapter, we discuss how we bridged from transplant studies in large animals to human application for two Phase 1 aSC transplant studies, one subacute and one chronic. Preclinical SC transplant studies conducted at the University of Miami in 2009–2012 in rodents, minipigs, and primates supported a successful Investigational New Drug (IND) submission for a Phase 1 trial in subacute complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Our studies optimized the safety and efficiency of intralesional cell delivery for subacute human SCI and led to the development of new simpler techniques for cell delivery into subjects with chronic SCI. Key parameters of delivery methodology include precision localization of the injury site, stereotaxic devices to control needle trajectory, method of entry into the spinal cord, spinal cord motion reduction, the volume and density of the cell suspension, rate of delivery, and control of shear stresses on cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages467-484
Number of pages18
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume1739
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Fingerprint

Schwann Cells
Spinal Cord Injuries
Transplants
Spinal Cord
Neural Stem Cells
Spinal Cord Regeneration
Investigational Drugs
Miniature Swine
Wounds and Injuries
Stromal Cells
Cell Size
Primates
Needles
Rodentia
Suspensions
Cell Count
Clinical Trials
Safety
Equipment and Supplies
Injections

Keywords

  • Apnea
  • Extrusion
  • Needle-free injection system
  • Piotomy
  • Schwann cell
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Syringe positioning device
  • Transplant
  • Ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Santamaría, A. J., Solano, J., Benavides, F. D., & Guest, J. D. (2018). Intraspinal delivery of Schwann cells for spinal cord injury. In Methods in Molecular Biology (pp. 467-484). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1739). Humana Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7649-2_31

Intraspinal delivery of Schwann cells for spinal cord injury. / Santamaría, Andrea J.; Solano, Juan; Benavides, Francisco D.; Guest, James D.

Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc., 2018. p. 467-484 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1739).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Santamaría, AJ, Solano, J, Benavides, FD & Guest, JD 2018, Intraspinal delivery of Schwann cells for spinal cord injury. in Methods in Molecular Biology. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 1739, Humana Press Inc., pp. 467-484. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7649-2_31
Santamaría AJ, Solano J, Benavides FD, Guest JD. Intraspinal delivery of Schwann cells for spinal cord injury. In Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc. 2018. p. 467-484. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7649-2_31
Santamaría, Andrea J. ; Solano, Juan ; Benavides, Francisco D. ; Guest, James D. / Intraspinal delivery of Schwann cells for spinal cord injury. Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc., 2018. pp. 467-484 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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