Intimate partner violence is linked to less HIV testing uptake among high-risk, HIV-negative women in Atlanta

Ogechukwu Etudo, Nicholas Metheny, Rob Stephenson, Ameeta S. Kalokhe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Increased risk of HIV acquisition among intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors underscores the need for regular HIV testing, but IPV-associated shame, stigma, and control may hinder uptake. Between March and November 2014, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 79 HIV-negative, high-risk women aged 18–50 in Atlanta, Georgia, to explore whether IPV experience was associated with less uptake of HIV testing, and fewer motivations and more reported barriers to HIV testing uptake. Psychological and physical and/or sexual abuse was significantly associated with less past-year HIV testing (p =.022 and p =.030, respectively), longer time since last HIV test (r = 0.282, p =.012, and r = 0.282, p =.012, respectively), and more reported barriers to HIV testing (r = 0.406, p =.004, and r = 0.389, p =.006). While requiring further validation, these preliminary findings suggest IPV survivors need additional support to access HIV testing services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)953-956
Number of pages4
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume29
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 3 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • gender-based violence
  • HIV
  • HIV testing
  • Intimate partner violence
  • violence against women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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