Intestinal parasites among young children in the interior of Guyana

J. F. Lindo, L. Validum, Arba L Ager, A. Campa, R. R. Cuadrado, R. Cummings, C. J. Palmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intestinal parasites contribute greatly to morbidity in developing countries. While there have been several studies of the problem in the Caribbean, including the implementation of control programmes, this has not been done for Guyana. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among young children in a town located in the interior of Guyana. Eighty-five children under the age of 12 years were studied prospectively for intestinal parasites in Mahdia, Guyana. Stool samples were transported in formalin to the Department of Microbiology, The University of the West Indies, Jamaica, for analysis using the formalin-ether concentration and Ziehl-Neelsen techniques. Data on age and gender of the children were recorded on field data sheets. At least one intestinal parasite was detected in 43.5% (37/85) of the children studied and multiple parasitic infections were recorded in 21.2% (18/85). The most common intestinal helminth parasite was hookworm (28.2%; 24/85), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (18.8%; 16/85) and then Trichuris trichuria (14.1%; 12/85). Among the protozoan infections Giardia lamblia was detected in 10.5% (9/85) of the study population while Entamoeba histolytica appeared rarely. All stool samples were negative for Cryptosporidium and other intestinal Coccidia. There was no predilection for gender with any of the parasites. The pattern of distribution of worms in this area of Guyana was unlike that seen in other studies. Hookworm infection was the most common among the children and a large proportion had multiple infections. The study established the occurrence and prevalence of a number of intestinal parasites in the population of Guyana. This sets the stage for the design and implementation of more detailed epidemiological studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-27
Number of pages3
JournalWest Indian Medical Journal
Volume51
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Guyana
Parasites
Formaldehyde
Hookworm Infections
Protozoan Infections
Coccidia
Ascaris lumbricoides
Jamaica
West Indies
Trichuris
Ancylostomatoidea
Giardia lamblia
Cryptosporidium
Entamoeba histolytica
Parasitic Diseases
Helminths
Microbiology
Ether
Population
Developing Countries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lindo, J. F., Validum, L., Ager, A. L., Campa, A., Cuadrado, R. R., Cummings, R., & Palmer, C. J. (2002). Intestinal parasites among young children in the interior of Guyana. West Indian Medical Journal, 51(1), 25-27.

Intestinal parasites among young children in the interior of Guyana. / Lindo, J. F.; Validum, L.; Ager, Arba L; Campa, A.; Cuadrado, R. R.; Cummings, R.; Palmer, C. J.

In: West Indian Medical Journal, Vol. 51, No. 1, 2002, p. 25-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lindo, JF, Validum, L, Ager, AL, Campa, A, Cuadrado, RR, Cummings, R & Palmer, CJ 2002, 'Intestinal parasites among young children in the interior of Guyana', West Indian Medical Journal, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 25-27.
Lindo JF, Validum L, Ager AL, Campa A, Cuadrado RR, Cummings R et al. Intestinal parasites among young children in the interior of Guyana. West Indian Medical Journal. 2002;51(1):25-27.
Lindo, J. F. ; Validum, L. ; Ager, Arba L ; Campa, A. ; Cuadrado, R. R. ; Cummings, R. ; Palmer, C. J. / Intestinal parasites among young children in the interior of Guyana. In: West Indian Medical Journal. 2002 ; Vol. 51, No. 1. pp. 25-27.
@article{216f78ae455b411ea02069421db17e3a,
title = "Intestinal parasites among young children in the interior of Guyana",
abstract = "Intestinal parasites contribute greatly to morbidity in developing countries. While there have been several studies of the problem in the Caribbean, including the implementation of control programmes, this has not been done for Guyana. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among young children in a town located in the interior of Guyana. Eighty-five children under the age of 12 years were studied prospectively for intestinal parasites in Mahdia, Guyana. Stool samples were transported in formalin to the Department of Microbiology, The University of the West Indies, Jamaica, for analysis using the formalin-ether concentration and Ziehl-Neelsen techniques. Data on age and gender of the children were recorded on field data sheets. At least one intestinal parasite was detected in 43.5{\%} (37/85) of the children studied and multiple parasitic infections were recorded in 21.2{\%} (18/85). The most common intestinal helminth parasite was hookworm (28.2{\%}; 24/85), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (18.8{\%}; 16/85) and then Trichuris trichuria (14.1{\%}; 12/85). Among the protozoan infections Giardia lamblia was detected in 10.5{\%} (9/85) of the study population while Entamoeba histolytica appeared rarely. All stool samples were negative for Cryptosporidium and other intestinal Coccidia. There was no predilection for gender with any of the parasites. The pattern of distribution of worms in this area of Guyana was unlike that seen in other studies. Hookworm infection was the most common among the children and a large proportion had multiple infections. The study established the occurrence and prevalence of a number of intestinal parasites in the population of Guyana. This sets the stage for the design and implementation of more detailed epidemiological studies.",
author = "Lindo, {J. F.} and L. Validum and Ager, {Arba L} and A. Campa and Cuadrado, {R. R.} and R. Cummings and Palmer, {C. J.}",
year = "2002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "51",
pages = "25--27",
journal = "West Indian Medical Journal",
issn = "0043-3144",
publisher = "University of the West Indies",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intestinal parasites among young children in the interior of Guyana

AU - Lindo, J. F.

AU - Validum, L.

AU - Ager, Arba L

AU - Campa, A.

AU - Cuadrado, R. R.

AU - Cummings, R.

AU - Palmer, C. J.

PY - 2002

Y1 - 2002

N2 - Intestinal parasites contribute greatly to morbidity in developing countries. While there have been several studies of the problem in the Caribbean, including the implementation of control programmes, this has not been done for Guyana. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among young children in a town located in the interior of Guyana. Eighty-five children under the age of 12 years were studied prospectively for intestinal parasites in Mahdia, Guyana. Stool samples were transported in formalin to the Department of Microbiology, The University of the West Indies, Jamaica, for analysis using the formalin-ether concentration and Ziehl-Neelsen techniques. Data on age and gender of the children were recorded on field data sheets. At least one intestinal parasite was detected in 43.5% (37/85) of the children studied and multiple parasitic infections were recorded in 21.2% (18/85). The most common intestinal helminth parasite was hookworm (28.2%; 24/85), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (18.8%; 16/85) and then Trichuris trichuria (14.1%; 12/85). Among the protozoan infections Giardia lamblia was detected in 10.5% (9/85) of the study population while Entamoeba histolytica appeared rarely. All stool samples were negative for Cryptosporidium and other intestinal Coccidia. There was no predilection for gender with any of the parasites. The pattern of distribution of worms in this area of Guyana was unlike that seen in other studies. Hookworm infection was the most common among the children and a large proportion had multiple infections. The study established the occurrence and prevalence of a number of intestinal parasites in the population of Guyana. This sets the stage for the design and implementation of more detailed epidemiological studies.

AB - Intestinal parasites contribute greatly to morbidity in developing countries. While there have been several studies of the problem in the Caribbean, including the implementation of control programmes, this has not been done for Guyana. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among young children in a town located in the interior of Guyana. Eighty-five children under the age of 12 years were studied prospectively for intestinal parasites in Mahdia, Guyana. Stool samples were transported in formalin to the Department of Microbiology, The University of the West Indies, Jamaica, for analysis using the formalin-ether concentration and Ziehl-Neelsen techniques. Data on age and gender of the children were recorded on field data sheets. At least one intestinal parasite was detected in 43.5% (37/85) of the children studied and multiple parasitic infections were recorded in 21.2% (18/85). The most common intestinal helminth parasite was hookworm (28.2%; 24/85), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (18.8%; 16/85) and then Trichuris trichuria (14.1%; 12/85). Among the protozoan infections Giardia lamblia was detected in 10.5% (9/85) of the study population while Entamoeba histolytica appeared rarely. All stool samples were negative for Cryptosporidium and other intestinal Coccidia. There was no predilection for gender with any of the parasites. The pattern of distribution of worms in this area of Guyana was unlike that seen in other studies. Hookworm infection was the most common among the children and a large proportion had multiple infections. The study established the occurrence and prevalence of a number of intestinal parasites in the population of Guyana. This sets the stage for the design and implementation of more detailed epidemiological studies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036262468&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036262468&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12089870

AN - SCOPUS:0036262468

VL - 51

SP - 25

EP - 27

JO - West Indian Medical Journal

JF - West Indian Medical Journal

SN - 0043-3144

IS - 1

ER -