Intermittent antegrade warm cardioplegia reduces oxidative stress and improves metabolism of the ischemic-reperfused human myocardium

Andrea Mezzetti, Antonio M. Calafiore, Domenico Lapenna, Roxanne Deslauriers, Ganghong Tian, Tomas A. Salerno, Anna M. Verna, Giovanni Bosco, Sante D. Pierdomenico, Franco Caccurullo

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61 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intermittent antegrade warm blood cardioplegia and intermittent antegrade cold blood cardioplegia on myocardial metabolism and free radical generation of the ischemic-reperfused human myocardium. Thirty patients undergoing mitral valve procedures were randomly allocated to two groups: group 1 (15 patients) received warm blood cardioplegia and group 2 (15 patients), cold blood cardioplegia. Myocardial metabolism was assessed before aortic clamping, 1 minute after crossclamp removal, and after 20 minutes of reperfusion, by collecting blood simultaneously from the radial artery and coronary sinus. All samples were analyzed for lactate, creatine kinase, reduced and oxidized glutathione, ascorbic acid, fluorescent products of lipid peroxidation, and leukocyte activation (elastase). In all patients, early reperfusion was associated with significant coronary sinus lactate release. In group 2, but not in group 1, significant coronary sinus release of reduced and oxidized glutathione, fluorescent products of lipid peroxidation, and creatine kinase was also found; moreover, arterial-coronary sinus difference of ascorbic acid content was increased only in group 2, suggesting a transmyocardial consumption of this antioxidant vitamin. After 20 minutes of reperfusion, coronary sinus lactate release was no longer present in group 1, whereas significant production was still evident in group 2. In this group, significant coronary sinus release of fluorescent products of lipoperoxidation and reduced and oxidized glutathione was also observed at this time. No significant release of elastase from the coronary sinus was noted in the two groups throughout the study. The left ventricular stroke work index measured at the end of the study indicated a better functional recovery in group 1 than in group 2. In conclusion, intermittent antegrade warm blood cardioplegia protects the myocardium from ischemia-reperfusion injury better than intermittent antegrade cold blood cardioplegia; this phenomenon may be partly due to the decreased tissue oxidant burden mediated by intermittent warm blood cardioplegia. (J THORAC CARDIOVASC SURG 1995;109:787-95).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)787-795
Number of pages9
JournalThe Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume109
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1995
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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    Mezzetti, A., Calafiore, A. M., Lapenna, D., Deslauriers, R., Tian, G., Salerno, T. A., Verna, A. M., Bosco, G., Pierdomenico, S. D., & Caccurullo, F. (1995). Intermittent antegrade warm cardioplegia reduces oxidative stress and improves metabolism of the ischemic-reperfused human myocardium. The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 109(4), 787-795. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-5223(95)70362-4