Intergenerational cardiovascular disease risks among Hispanics living in the United States

Marissa A. Kobayashi, Tae K. Lee, Sara M. St. George, Cynthia Lebron, David Dorcius, Guillermo Prado, Sarah E. Messiah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Few studies have assessed intergenerational associations of obesity and cardiovascular disease risks from parents to their children among Hispanic Americans. Objectives: To assess intergenerational cardiovascular associations among Hispanic families. Methods: Using baseline data from an obesity-focused efficacy trial targeting Hispanic adolescents (n = 280) and their parents, we conducted a series of logistic regression analyses to investigate the effects of parental BMI and blood pressure on adolescents' BMI and blood pressure, respectively. Results: After adjusting for significant socio-demographic variables and adolescents' lifestyle behaviours, adolescents were more than twice as likely to be in the severely obese versus overweight range when their parents had obesity (vs. non-obese; OR = 2.55, 95% CI = 1.20, 5.39) and more than twice as likely to be in the severely obese versus obese weight range (OR = 2.44, 95% CI = 1.22, 4.87) when their parents had obesity. When compared to those with normal blood pressure, adolescents who had parents with elevated blood pressure/hypertension were more than twice as likely to have elevated blood pressure (OR = 2.05, 95% CI = 1.04, 4.00) or be classified as hypertensive stage 1/2 (OR = 2.81, 95% CI = 1.31, 6.01). Conclusions: Both severe obesity and elevated blood pressure are highly associated among Hispanic parent–child dyads. Findings underscore the potential benefits of intervening with the family system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric Obesity
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease
  • Hispanic
  • hypertension
  • intergenerational
  • obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Health Policy
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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