Interactive Associations of Neuropsychiatry Inventory-Questionnaire Assessed Sleep Disturbance and Vascular Risk on Alzheimer’s Disease Stage Progression in Clinically Normal Older Adults

Omonigho M. Bubu, Ellita T. Williams, Ogie Q. Umasabor-Bubu, Sonya S. Kaur, Arlener D. Turner, Judite Blanc, Jaime Ramos Cejudo, Anna E. Mullins, Ankit Parekh, Korey Kam, Zainab T. Osakwe, Ann W. Nguyen, Antoine R. Trammell, Alfred K. Mbah, Mony de Leon, David M. Rapoport, Indu Ayappa, Gbenga Ogedegbe, Girardin Jean-Louis, Arjun V. MasurkarAndrew W. Varga, Ricardo S. Osorio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: To determine whether sleep disturbance (SD) and vascular-risk interact to promote Alzheimer’s disease (AD) stage-progression in normal, community-dwelling older adults and evaluate their combined risk beyond that of established AD biomarkers. Methods: Longitudinal data from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center Uniform-Dataset. SD data (i.e., SD+ vs. SD-), as characterized by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire, were derived from 10,600 participants at baseline, with at-least one follow-up visit. A subset (n = 361) had baseline cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers and MRI data. The Framingham heart study general cardiovascular disease (FHS-CVD) risk-score was used to quantify vascular risk. Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) diagnosis during follow-up characterized AD stage-progression. Logistic mixed-effects models with random intercept and slope examined the interaction of SD and vascular risk on prospective aMCI diagnosis. Results: Of the 10,600 participants, 1,017 (9.6%) reported SD and 6,572 (62%) were female. The overall mean (SD) age was 70.5 (6.5), and follow-up time was 5.1 (2.7) years. SD and the FHS-CVD risk-score were each associated with incident aMCI (aOR: 1.42 and aOR: 2.11, p < 0.01 for both). The interaction of SD and FHS-CVD risk-score with time was significant (aOR: 2.87, p < 0.01), suggesting a synergistic effect. SD and FHS-CVD risk-score estimates remained significantly associated with incident aMCI even after adjusting for CSF (Aβ, T-tau, P-tau) and hippocampal volume (n = 361) (aOR: 2.55, p < 0.01), and approximated risk-estimates of each biomarker in the sample where data was available. Conclusions: Clinical measures of sleep and vascular risk may complement current AD biomarkers in assessing risk of cognitive decline in older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number763264
JournalFrontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Volume13
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 10 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • amnestic mild cognitive impairment
  • biomarkers
  • cardiovascular disease
  • sleep disturbance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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