Intelligence and blood pressure in the aged

Frances Wilkie, Carl Eisdorfer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

173 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diastolic hypertension was related to significant intellectual loss over a 10-year period among individuals initially examined in their 60's. Such loss was not found in their age peers in association with normal or mild elevations of blood pressure. Of the subjects initially examined at 70 to 79 years of age, none with hypertension completed the follow-up program, and those with normal and mildly elevated blood pressure showed some intellectual decline over the decade. At the initial examination, hypertension was related to lower intelligence test scores only among those subjects who subsequently did not complete the follow-up program. The results suggest that hypertension is related to intellectual changes among the aged.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)959-962
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume172
Issue number3986
StatePublished - Dec 1 1971
Externally publishedYes

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Intelligence
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Intelligence Tests

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Wilkie, F., & Eisdorfer, C. (1971). Intelligence and blood pressure in the aged. Science, 172(3986), 959-962.

Intelligence and blood pressure in the aged. / Wilkie, Frances; Eisdorfer, Carl.

In: Science, Vol. 172, No. 3986, 01.12.1971, p. 959-962.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilkie, F & Eisdorfer, C 1971, 'Intelligence and blood pressure in the aged', Science, vol. 172, no. 3986, pp. 959-962.
Wilkie F, Eisdorfer C. Intelligence and blood pressure in the aged. Science. 1971 Dec 1;172(3986):959-962.
Wilkie, Frances ; Eisdorfer, Carl. / Intelligence and blood pressure in the aged. In: Science. 1971 ; Vol. 172, No. 3986. pp. 959-962.
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