Integrating race, place and motive in social disorganization theory: Lessons from a comparison of black and Latino homicide types in two immigrant destination cities

Amie L. Nielsen, Matthew T. Lee, Ramiro Martinez

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

91 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, we examine and compare the impact of social disorganization, including recent immigration, and other predictors on community counts of black and Latino motive-specific homicides in Miami and San Diego. Homicides for 1985 to 1995 are disaggregated into escalation, intimate, robbery and drug-related motives. Negative binomial regression models with corrections for spatial autocorrelation demonstrate that there are similarities and differences in effects of social disorganization and other predictors by motive-specific outcomes, as well as for outcomes across ethnic groups within cities and within ethnic groups across cities. Recent immigration is negatively or not associated with most outcomes. Overall, the study shows the importance of disaggregating homicide data by race/ethnicity and motive and demonstrates that predictions based on existing theories are qualified on local conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)837-872
Number of pages36
JournalCriminology
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005

Keywords

  • Communities
  • Homicide
  • Homicide motives
  • Immigration
  • Latinos
  • Race/ethnic differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

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