Insulin stimulation of fatty acid synthesis in human breast cancer cells. Brief communication

M. E. Monaco, C. Kent Osborne, Marc E Lippman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Four human breast cancer cell lines were tested for their response to hormones with respect to the lactational function, fatty acid synthesis. Physiologic concentrations of insulin enhanced the incorporation of [14C]acetate into fatty acids in 2 of 4 cell lines tested. All cell lines had specific, high-affinity insulin receptors; therefore, the failure of two lines to respond could not be attributed to the absence of receptor. The effect of insulin involved an increase in the maximum velocity of incorporation rather than a decrease in the Michaelis constant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1591-1593
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume58
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1 1977
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Fatty Acids
Communication
Insulin
Breast Neoplasms
Cell Line
Insulin Receptor
Acetates
Hormones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Insulin stimulation of fatty acid synthesis in human breast cancer cells. Brief communication. / Monaco, M. E.; Kent Osborne, C.; Lippman, Marc E.

In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 58, No. 6, 01.12.1977, p. 1591-1593.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Monaco, M. E. ; Kent Osborne, C. ; Lippman, Marc E. / Insulin stimulation of fatty acid synthesis in human breast cancer cells. Brief communication. In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1977 ; Vol. 58, No. 6. pp. 1591-1593.
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