Insulin resistance, obesity, inflammation, and depression in polycystic ovary syndrome: Biobehavioral mechanisms and interventions

Kristen Farrell, Michael H Antoni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To summarize physiological and psychological characteristics that are common among women diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and provide evidence suggesting that addressing psychological disturbances can reduce or alleviate physical symptoms of PCOS through behavioral pathways and physiological pathways. Method(s): Empirical studies and expert consensuses pertaining to physiological, psychological, and medical management aspects of PCOS were identified and presented in this review. Articles were identified by searching Pubmed, PsycInfo, Medline ISI, CINAHL, or a Web browser (i.e., Google) using numerous combinations of terms pertaining to physiological, psychological, and medical management aspects of PCOS. An article was chosen to be included in this review if it reported findings and/or provided information that related to and helped support the main purpose(s) of this review article. Result(s): Available literature on the physiological (i.e., hyperandrogenism, central obesity, inflammation, insulin resistance) and psychological (i.e., depression, anxiety, eating disorders) factors among women with PCOS provides evidence that these various aspects of PCOS are strongly interrelated. Conclusion(s): The existence of these relationships among physiological and psychological factors strongly suggests that medical management of PCOS would greatly benefit from inclusion of psychological and behavioral approaches.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1565-1574
Number of pages10
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume94
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010

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Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Insulin Resistance
Obesity
Depression
Psychology
Inflammation
Web Browser
Hyperandrogenism
Abdominal Obesity
Anxiety Disorders
PubMed

Keywords

  • depression
  • hyperandrogenism
  • inflammation
  • insulin resistance
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • stress management
  • visceral fat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

Cite this

Insulin resistance, obesity, inflammation, and depression in polycystic ovary syndrome : Biobehavioral mechanisms and interventions. / Farrell, Kristen; Antoni, Michael H.

In: Fertility and Sterility, Vol. 94, No. 5, 01.10.2010, p. 1565-1574.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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