Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 increased in preterm neonates following massage therapy

Tiffany M Field, Miguel A Diego, Maria Hernandez-Reif, John N I Dieter, Adarsh Kumar, Saul Schanberg, Cynthia Kuhn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine if massage therapy increased serum insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) in preterm neonates. STUDY DESIGN: Forty-two preterm neonates who averaged 34.6 weeks (M = 29.5 wk gestational age; M birth weight = 1237 g) and were in the "grower" (step-down) nursery were randomly assigned to a massage therapy group (body stroking and passive limb movements for three, 15-minute periods per day for 5 days) or a control group that received the standard nursery care without massage therapy. On Days 1 and 5, the serum collected by clinical heelsticks was also assayed for insulin and IGF-1, and weight gain and kilocalories consumed were recorded daily. RESULTS: Despite similar formula intake, the massaged preterm neonates showed greater increases during the 5-day period in (1) weight gain; (2) serum levels of insulin; and (3) IGF-1. Increased weight gain was significantly correlated with insulin and IGF-1. DISCUSSION: Previous data suggested that preterm infant weight gain following massage therapy related to increased vagal activity, which suggests decreased stress and gastric motility, which may contribute to more efficient food absorption. The data from this study suggest for the first time that weight gain was also related to increased serum insulin and IGF-1 levels following massage therapy. CONCLUSION: Preterm infants who received massage therapy not only showed greater weight gain but also a greater increase in serum insulin and IGF-1 levels, suggesting that massage therapy might be prescribed for all growing neonates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)463-466
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

Fingerprint

Massage
Somatomedins
Weight Gain
Newborn Infant
Insulin
Serum
Nurseries
Premature Infants
Birth Weight
Gestational Age
Stomach
Extremities
Food
Control Groups

Keywords

  • IGF-1
  • Massage therapy
  • Preterm infants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 increased in preterm neonates following massage therapy. / Field, Tiffany M; Diego, Miguel A; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Dieter, John N I; Kumar, Adarsh; Schanberg, Saul; Kuhn, Cynthia.

In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Vol. 29, No. 6, 01.12.2008, p. 463-466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Field, Tiffany M ; Diego, Miguel A ; Hernandez-Reif, Maria ; Dieter, John N I ; Kumar, Adarsh ; Schanberg, Saul ; Kuhn, Cynthia. / Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 increased in preterm neonates following massage therapy. In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. 2008 ; Vol. 29, No. 6. pp. 463-466.
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