Instrumentation to record evoked ankle movements in anesthetized rats

Katie Gant, Jorge Bohorquez, Yang Liu, Robert M. Grumbles, Christine K Thomas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

When limb movements are evoked by electrical stimulation, muscle contraction (e.g. 15-20 ms) and relaxation are fast and would be poorly sampled by video-capture with average frame rates of 60 Hz. Our aim was to design a device capable of monitoring ankle joint excursion evoked by nerve stimulation in anesthetized rats. A custom footplate was coupled to the wiper of a low-torque rotary style potentiometer so output voltage was proportional to ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. Anesthetized rats lay prone with the hip and knee clamped at 90°. The foot was taped to the footplate so resting ankle angle was 90°. In eight healthy rats, pulses were delivered to the tibial and common peroneal nerves (10-400 μs, 1-200 Hz, 1-150 V). Average (±SD) minimum excursions in dorsiflexion and plantarflexion were 0.34° ± 0.34° and 0.46° ± 0.39°, respectively. Maximum dorsiflexion was reached at 56° ± 13°, whereas plantarflexion was attained at 178° ± 11° (180° = full plantarflexion). Changes in pulse amplitude, duration, and frequency provided intermediate dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. This device is able to monitor gradations of evoked limb movements throughout the entire joint range and will be useful to evaluate whether interventions improve function in weak or paralyzed muscles.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013
Pages29-30
Number of pages2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 5 2013
Event29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013 - Miami, FL, United States
Duration: May 3 2013May 5 2013

Other

Other29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013
CountryUnited States
CityMiami, FL
Period5/3/135/5/13

Fingerprint

Rats
Muscle
Torque
Monitoring
Electric potential

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Gant, K., Bohorquez, J., Liu, Y., Grumbles, R. M., & Thomas, C. K. (2013). Instrumentation to record evoked ankle movements in anesthetized rats. In Proceedings - 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013 (pp. 29-30). [6525660] https://doi.org/10.1109/SBEC.2013.23

Instrumentation to record evoked ankle movements in anesthetized rats. / Gant, Katie; Bohorquez, Jorge; Liu, Yang; Grumbles, Robert M.; Thomas, Christine K.

Proceedings - 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013. 2013. p. 29-30 6525660.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Gant, K, Bohorquez, J, Liu, Y, Grumbles, RM & Thomas, CK 2013, Instrumentation to record evoked ankle movements in anesthetized rats. in Proceedings - 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013., 6525660, pp. 29-30, 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013, Miami, FL, United States, 5/3/13. https://doi.org/10.1109/SBEC.2013.23
Gant K, Bohorquez J, Liu Y, Grumbles RM, Thomas CK. Instrumentation to record evoked ankle movements in anesthetized rats. In Proceedings - 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013. 2013. p. 29-30. 6525660 https://doi.org/10.1109/SBEC.2013.23
Gant, Katie ; Bohorquez, Jorge ; Liu, Yang ; Grumbles, Robert M. ; Thomas, Christine K. / Instrumentation to record evoked ankle movements in anesthetized rats. Proceedings - 29th Southern Biomedical Engineering Conference, SBEC 2013. 2013. pp. 29-30
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