Insights into the inhibition of platelet activation by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: Beyond aspirin and clopidogrel

Mauricio G Cohen, Joseph S. Rossi, Jennifer Garbarino, Regina Bowling, Alison A. Motsinger-Reif, Carl Schuler, Allison G. Dupont, Don Gabriel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We sought to examine the effects of escalating doses of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplements on platelet function using light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and electrophoretic quasi-elastic light scattering technology (EQELS). Background: PUFA may inhibit platelet function through fatty acid substitution in the platelet membrane by changing the surface charge density and causing decreased production of thromboxane A2. EQELS can measure platelet surface charge density and determine whether the platelet is in resting or activated state. Methods: A total of 30volunteers were divided in 3 groups of 10 as follows: Group A, no antiplatelet agent; Group B, daily aspirin only, and Group C, daily aspirin and clopidogrel. All patients received escalating doses of omega-3PUFA from 1 to 8 g daily over 24 weeks. Platelet function was measured by template bleeding time, LTA, and EQELS at baseline and at 6, 12, 18 and 24 weeks. Results: Mean bleeding time increased in a dose-dependent manner with escalating omega-3 PUFA doses. LTA confirmed expected antiplatelet effects of aspirin and clopidogrel, but did not detect any additional antiplatelet effects of omega-3 PUFA. EQELS showed a significant increase in the negative resting platelet charge compared to baseline and an attenuated response to arachidonic acid mediated platelet activation. No bleeding events were observed. Conclusions: In this pilot study we were able to successfully measure platelet surface charge variation as a measure of omega-3 PUFA effect on platelets. Our results suggest that omega-3 PUFA increase the total platelet surface charge and, therefore, attenuate platelet activation, even among patients taking aspirin or aspirin plus clopidogrel. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of these measured effects and EQELS results.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-340
Number of pages6
JournalThrombosis Research
Volume128
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

Fingerprint

clopidogrel
Platelet Activation
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Aspirin
Blood Platelets
Technology
Bleeding Time
Light
Thromboxane A2

Keywords

  • AA
  • Adenosine diphosphate
  • ADP
  • Arachidonic acid
  • DHA
  • Docosohexaenoic acid
  • Eicosapentaenoic acid
  • Electrophoretic quasi-elastic light scattering
  • EPA
  • EQELS
  • INR
  • International normalized ratio
  • Light transmission aggregometry
  • LTA
  • Platelet poor plasma
  • Platelet rich plasma
  • Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid
  • PPP
  • PRP
  • PUFA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Insights into the inhibition of platelet activation by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids : Beyond aspirin and clopidogrel. / Cohen, Mauricio G; Rossi, Joseph S.; Garbarino, Jennifer; Bowling, Regina; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.; Schuler, Carl; Dupont, Allison G.; Gabriel, Don.

In: Thrombosis Research, Vol. 128, No. 4, 01.10.2011, p. 335-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cohen, MG, Rossi, JS, Garbarino, J, Bowling, R, Motsinger-Reif, AA, Schuler, C, Dupont, AG & Gabriel, D 2011, 'Insights into the inhibition of platelet activation by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: Beyond aspirin and clopidogrel', Thrombosis Research, vol. 128, no. 4, pp. 335-340. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2011.04.023
Cohen, Mauricio G ; Rossi, Joseph S. ; Garbarino, Jennifer ; Bowling, Regina ; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A. ; Schuler, Carl ; Dupont, Allison G. ; Gabriel, Don. / Insights into the inhibition of platelet activation by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids : Beyond aspirin and clopidogrel. In: Thrombosis Research. 2011 ; Vol. 128, No. 4. pp. 335-340.
@article{3fc6001f984a4e309a43562a1dc4ef75,
title = "Insights into the inhibition of platelet activation by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids: Beyond aspirin and clopidogrel",
abstract = "Objectives: We sought to examine the effects of escalating doses of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplements on platelet function using light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and electrophoretic quasi-elastic light scattering technology (EQELS). Background: PUFA may inhibit platelet function through fatty acid substitution in the platelet membrane by changing the surface charge density and causing decreased production of thromboxane A2. EQELS can measure platelet surface charge density and determine whether the platelet is in resting or activated state. Methods: A total of 30volunteers were divided in 3 groups of 10 as follows: Group A, no antiplatelet agent; Group B, daily aspirin only, and Group C, daily aspirin and clopidogrel. All patients received escalating doses of omega-3PUFA from 1 to 8 g daily over 24 weeks. Platelet function was measured by template bleeding time, LTA, and EQELS at baseline and at 6, 12, 18 and 24 weeks. Results: Mean bleeding time increased in a dose-dependent manner with escalating omega-3 PUFA doses. LTA confirmed expected antiplatelet effects of aspirin and clopidogrel, but did not detect any additional antiplatelet effects of omega-3 PUFA. EQELS showed a significant increase in the negative resting platelet charge compared to baseline and an attenuated response to arachidonic acid mediated platelet activation. No bleeding events were observed. Conclusions: In this pilot study we were able to successfully measure platelet surface charge variation as a measure of omega-3 PUFA effect on platelets. Our results suggest that omega-3 PUFA increase the total platelet surface charge and, therefore, attenuate platelet activation, even among patients taking aspirin or aspirin plus clopidogrel. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of these measured effects and EQELS results.",
keywords = "AA, Adenosine diphosphate, ADP, Arachidonic acid, DHA, Docosohexaenoic acid, Eicosapentaenoic acid, Electrophoretic quasi-elastic light scattering, EPA, EQELS, INR, International normalized ratio, Light transmission aggregometry, LTA, Platelet poor plasma, Platelet rich plasma, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid, PPP, PRP, PUFA",
author = "Cohen, {Mauricio G} and Rossi, {Joseph S.} and Jennifer Garbarino and Regina Bowling and Motsinger-Reif, {Alison A.} and Carl Schuler and Dupont, {Allison G.} and Don Gabriel",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.thromres.2011.04.023",
language = "English",
volume = "128",
pages = "335--340",
journal = "Thrombosis Research",
issn = "0049-3848",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Insights into the inhibition of platelet activation by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

T2 - Beyond aspirin and clopidogrel

AU - Cohen, Mauricio G

AU - Rossi, Joseph S.

AU - Garbarino, Jennifer

AU - Bowling, Regina

AU - Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.

AU - Schuler, Carl

AU - Dupont, Allison G.

AU - Gabriel, Don

PY - 2011/10/1

Y1 - 2011/10/1

N2 - Objectives: We sought to examine the effects of escalating doses of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplements on platelet function using light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and electrophoretic quasi-elastic light scattering technology (EQELS). Background: PUFA may inhibit platelet function through fatty acid substitution in the platelet membrane by changing the surface charge density and causing decreased production of thromboxane A2. EQELS can measure platelet surface charge density and determine whether the platelet is in resting or activated state. Methods: A total of 30volunteers were divided in 3 groups of 10 as follows: Group A, no antiplatelet agent; Group B, daily aspirin only, and Group C, daily aspirin and clopidogrel. All patients received escalating doses of omega-3PUFA from 1 to 8 g daily over 24 weeks. Platelet function was measured by template bleeding time, LTA, and EQELS at baseline and at 6, 12, 18 and 24 weeks. Results: Mean bleeding time increased in a dose-dependent manner with escalating omega-3 PUFA doses. LTA confirmed expected antiplatelet effects of aspirin and clopidogrel, but did not detect any additional antiplatelet effects of omega-3 PUFA. EQELS showed a significant increase in the negative resting platelet charge compared to baseline and an attenuated response to arachidonic acid mediated platelet activation. No bleeding events were observed. Conclusions: In this pilot study we were able to successfully measure platelet surface charge variation as a measure of omega-3 PUFA effect on platelets. Our results suggest that omega-3 PUFA increase the total platelet surface charge and, therefore, attenuate platelet activation, even among patients taking aspirin or aspirin plus clopidogrel. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of these measured effects and EQELS results.

AB - Objectives: We sought to examine the effects of escalating doses of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplements on platelet function using light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and electrophoretic quasi-elastic light scattering technology (EQELS). Background: PUFA may inhibit platelet function through fatty acid substitution in the platelet membrane by changing the surface charge density and causing decreased production of thromboxane A2. EQELS can measure platelet surface charge density and determine whether the platelet is in resting or activated state. Methods: A total of 30volunteers were divided in 3 groups of 10 as follows: Group A, no antiplatelet agent; Group B, daily aspirin only, and Group C, daily aspirin and clopidogrel. All patients received escalating doses of omega-3PUFA from 1 to 8 g daily over 24 weeks. Platelet function was measured by template bleeding time, LTA, and EQELS at baseline and at 6, 12, 18 and 24 weeks. Results: Mean bleeding time increased in a dose-dependent manner with escalating omega-3 PUFA doses. LTA confirmed expected antiplatelet effects of aspirin and clopidogrel, but did not detect any additional antiplatelet effects of omega-3 PUFA. EQELS showed a significant increase in the negative resting platelet charge compared to baseline and an attenuated response to arachidonic acid mediated platelet activation. No bleeding events were observed. Conclusions: In this pilot study we were able to successfully measure platelet surface charge variation as a measure of omega-3 PUFA effect on platelets. Our results suggest that omega-3 PUFA increase the total platelet surface charge and, therefore, attenuate platelet activation, even among patients taking aspirin or aspirin plus clopidogrel. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical significance of these measured effects and EQELS results.

KW - AA

KW - Adenosine diphosphate

KW - ADP

KW - Arachidonic acid

KW - DHA

KW - Docosohexaenoic acid

KW - Eicosapentaenoic acid

KW - Electrophoretic quasi-elastic light scattering

KW - EPA

KW - EQELS

KW - INR

KW - International normalized ratio

KW - Light transmission aggregometry

KW - LTA

KW - Platelet poor plasma

KW - Platelet rich plasma

KW - Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid

KW - PPP

KW - PRP

KW - PUFA

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80955180540&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80955180540&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.thromres.2011.04.023

DO - 10.1016/j.thromres.2011.04.023

M3 - Article

C2 - 21621252

AN - SCOPUS:80955180540

VL - 128

SP - 335

EP - 340

JO - Thrombosis Research

JF - Thrombosis Research

SN - 0049-3848

IS - 4

ER -