Injury patterns and outcomes following pediatric bicycle accidents

Laura F. Teisch, Casey J. Allen, Jun Tashiro, Samuel Golpanian, David Lasko, Nicholas Namias, Holly Neville, Juan E Sola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Other than automobiles, bicycles are connected to more pediatric injuries than any other consumer product. Whereas characterization of injury patterns following motor vehicle accidents has led to safety initiatives and treatment guidelines, knowledge related to bicyclist injuries is lacking. Our purpose is to identify major injury patterns and outcomes associated with pediatric bicycle accidents. Methods: From January 2000 to December 2012, 1934 consecutive pediatric admissions (≤17 years) at a level I trauma center were retrospectively reviewed for mechanism injury, demographics, and outcomes. Parametric data were analyzed with student’s t test and are presented as mean ± standard deviation. Nonparametric data were analyzed with Mann–Whitney-U test and are presented as median (interquartile range). Analysis was performed to recognize injury patterns and outcomes significantly associated with bicycle related accidents. Results: 80 pediatric patients were admitted following bicycle related trauma (4 % of all pediatric trauma admissions). The cohort was age 11 ± 4 years, ISS 11 ± 10, 48 % black, and 81 % male. Injury patterns included 21 % isolated head, 21 % isolated abdominal, 13 % isolated extremity, and 34 % multiple injuries. 5 % were age 0–4 years, 35 % were age 5–9 years, 45 % were 10–14 years, and 15 % were 15–17 years (p 

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1021-1025
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Surgery International
Volume31
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 13 2015

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Accidents
Pediatrics
Wounds and Injuries
Automobiles
Multiple Trauma
Trauma Centers
Motor Vehicles
Extremities
Head
Demography
Guidelines
Students
Safety

Keywords

  • Bikes
  • Child safety
  • Children
  • Helmets
  • Injury prevention
  • Kids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery

Cite this

Injury patterns and outcomes following pediatric bicycle accidents. / Teisch, Laura F.; Allen, Casey J.; Tashiro, Jun; Golpanian, Samuel; Lasko, David; Namias, Nicholas; Neville, Holly; Sola, Juan E.

In: Pediatric Surgery International, Vol. 31, No. 11, 13.08.2015, p. 1021-1025.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Teisch, Laura F. ; Allen, Casey J. ; Tashiro, Jun ; Golpanian, Samuel ; Lasko, David ; Namias, Nicholas ; Neville, Holly ; Sola, Juan E. / Injury patterns and outcomes following pediatric bicycle accidents. In: Pediatric Surgery International. 2015 ; Vol. 31, No. 11. pp. 1021-1025.
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