Initial experience with the transurethral self-detachable balloon system for urinary incontinence in pediatric patients

David A. Diamond, Stuart B. Bauer, Alan B. Retik, Anthony Atala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: A new endoscopic technique to treat urinary incontinence in children using a self-detachable balloon device was studied. Materials and Methods: The study includes 11 patients with a mean age of 14.6 years and all of whom had intrinsic sphincter deficiency due to myelomeningocele in 9, spinal artery bleed in 1 and cloacal exstrophy in 1. All patients were on clean intermittent catheterization preoperatively and postoperatively. Endoscopic balloon treatment was performed on an outpatient basis. A mean of 5 balloons (range 2 to 8) were placed per patient. All patients underwent formal urodynamic study preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 6 months following balloon placement. Results: Of the 9 patients without prior bladder neck surgery 7 had improvement in urodynamic parameters, including urethral pressure profile in all 7 and functional bladder capacity in 6, 4 were markedly improved clinically and 2 were dry. Two patients with prior bladder neck surgery were clinically unchanged following balloon placement, although I had urodynamic improvement. Conclusions: Our initial experience with the transurethral self-detachable balloon system as a minimally invasive outpatient procedure to treat urinary incontinence in children has been encouraging. To date this procedure appears most applicable to the patient who has not undergone surgery and has a neurogenic etiology for urinary incontinence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)942-946
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume164
Issue number3 II
StatePublished - Sep 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Urinary Incontinence
Pediatrics
Urodynamics
Urinary Bladder
Outpatients
Intermittent Urethral Catheterization
Meningomyelocele
Arteries
Pressure
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Endoscopy
  • Pediatrics
  • Urethra
  • Urinary incontinence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Initial experience with the transurethral self-detachable balloon system for urinary incontinence in pediatric patients. / Diamond, David A.; Bauer, Stuart B.; Retik, Alan B.; Atala, Anthony.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 164, No. 3 II, 01.09.2000, p. 942-946.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Diamond, David A. ; Bauer, Stuart B. ; Retik, Alan B. ; Atala, Anthony. / Initial experience with the transurethral self-detachable balloon system for urinary incontinence in pediatric patients. In: Journal of Urology. 2000 ; Vol. 164, No. 3 II. pp. 942-946.
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