Initial experience using microwave ablation therapy for renal tumor treatment

18-Month follow-up

Scott M. Castle, Nelson Salas, Raymond J. Leveillee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To assess efficacy and morbidity of microwave ablation (MWA) for small renal tumors in an initial cohort of patients. MWA is a recently introduced thermal needle ablation treatment modality with theoretical advantages compared with radiofrequency ablation, such as greater intratumoral temperatures, lack of a grounding pad, and superior convection profile. However, experience has been limited in the human kidney. Methods: Ten patients with a single, solid-enhancing renal tumor from June 2008 to November 2008 received laparoscopic or computed tomography-guided percutaneous MWA at a tertiary referral center with <14 months of follow-up. MWA was performed using the Valleylab Evident, 915-MHz MWA system at 45 W with intraoperative biopsy before ablation, and peripheral fiberoptic thermometry to determine the treatment endpoints. The patients were followed up with contrast-enhanced computed tomography at 1 month, 6 months to 1 year, and annually to monitor for tumor recurrence. Results: The follow-up duration for the 6 male and 4 female patients (mean tumor size 3.65 cm, range 2.0-5.5; mean age 69.8 years) was 17.9 months. The recurrence rate, defined by persistent enhancement, was 38% (3 of 8). The intraoperative and postoperative complication rate was 20% and 40%, respectively. Conclusions: MWA resulted in poor oncologic outcomes with a significant complication rate at an intermediate level of follow-up. However, MWA has promising theoretical advantages and should not be discarded. Additional studies should be considered to better understand the microwave-tissue interaction and treatment endpoints for different size renal masses before widespread use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)792-797
Number of pages6
JournalUrology
Volume77
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Microwaves
Kidney
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Tomography
Thermometry
Recurrence
Convection
Intraoperative Complications
Tertiary Care Centers
Needles
Hot Temperature
Morbidity
Biopsy
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Initial experience using microwave ablation therapy for renal tumor treatment : 18-Month follow-up. / Castle, Scott M.; Salas, Nelson; Leveillee, Raymond J.

In: Urology, Vol. 77, No. 4, 01.04.2011, p. 792-797.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Castle, Scott M. ; Salas, Nelson ; Leveillee, Raymond J. / Initial experience using microwave ablation therapy for renal tumor treatment : 18-Month follow-up. In: Urology. 2011 ; Vol. 77, No. 4. pp. 792-797.
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