Inhibition of growth, production of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF- II), and expression of IGF-II mRNA of human cancer cell lines by antagonistic analogs of growth hormone-releasing hormone in vitro

V. J. Csernus, Andrew V Schally, H. Kiaris, P. Armatis

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73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antagonistic analogs of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) suppress growth of various tumors in vivo. This effect is exerted in part through inhibition of the GHRH-GH-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I axis. Nevertheless, because autocrine/paracrine control of proliferation by IGF-II also is a major factor in many tumors, the interference with this growth- stimulating pathway would offer another approach to tumor control. We thus investigated whether GHRH antagonists MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 also act on the tumor cells directly by blocking the production of IGF-II. An increase in the IGF-II concentration in the media during culture was found in 13 of 26 human cancer cell lines tested. Reverse transcription-PCR studies on 8 of these cell lines showed that they also expressed IGF-II mRNA. Antagonists of GHRH significantly inhibited the rate of proliferation of mammary (MDA-MB-468 and ZR-75-1), prostatic (PC-3 and DU-145), and pancreatic (MiaPaCa-2, SW-1990, and Capan-2) cancer cell lines as shown by colorimetric and [3H]thymidine incorporation tests and reduced the expression of IGF-II mRNA in the cells and the concentration of IGF-II secreted into the culture medium. Growth and IGF-II production of lung (H-23 and H-69) and ovarian (OV-1063) cancer cells that express mRNA for IGF-II and excrete large quantities of IGF-II also was marginally suppressed by the antagonists. These findings suggest that antagonistic analogs of GHRH can inhibit growth of certain tumors not only by inhibiting the GHRH-GH-IGF-I axis, but also by reducing the IGF-II production and by interfering with the autocrine regulatory pathway.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3098-3103
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume96
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 8 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone
Insulin-Like Growth Factor II
Cell Line
Messenger RNA
Growth
Neoplasms
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I
Culture Media
In Vitro Techniques
Hormone Antagonists
Thymidine
Reverse Transcription
Breast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

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title = "Inhibition of growth, production of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF- II), and expression of IGF-II mRNA of human cancer cell lines by antagonistic analogs of growth hormone-releasing hormone in vitro",
abstract = "Antagonistic analogs of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) suppress growth of various tumors in vivo. This effect is exerted in part through inhibition of the GHRH-GH-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I axis. Nevertheless, because autocrine/paracrine control of proliferation by IGF-II also is a major factor in many tumors, the interference with this growth- stimulating pathway would offer another approach to tumor control. We thus investigated whether GHRH antagonists MZ-4-71 and MZ-5-156 also act on the tumor cells directly by blocking the production of IGF-II. An increase in the IGF-II concentration in the media during culture was found in 13 of 26 human cancer cell lines tested. Reverse transcription-PCR studies on 8 of these cell lines showed that they also expressed IGF-II mRNA. Antagonists of GHRH significantly inhibited the rate of proliferation of mammary (MDA-MB-468 and ZR-75-1), prostatic (PC-3 and DU-145), and pancreatic (MiaPaCa-2, SW-1990, and Capan-2) cancer cell lines as shown by colorimetric and [3H]thymidine incorporation tests and reduced the expression of IGF-II mRNA in the cells and the concentration of IGF-II secreted into the culture medium. Growth and IGF-II production of lung (H-23 and H-69) and ovarian (OV-1063) cancer cells that express mRNA for IGF-II and excrete large quantities of IGF-II also was marginally suppressed by the antagonists. These findings suggest that antagonistic analogs of GHRH can inhibit growth of certain tumors not only by inhibiting the GHRH-GH-IGF-I axis, but also by reducing the IGF-II production and by interfering with the autocrine regulatory pathway.",
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AU - Csernus, V. J.

AU - Schally, Andrew V

AU - Kiaris, H.

AU - Armatis, P.

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