Information behaviors and problem chain recognition effect: Applying situational theory of problem solving in organ donation issues

Jeong Nam Kim, Hongmei Shen, Susan Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identification of active subpopulations who are motivated to talk about, seek out, and select information about organ donation-related issues can improve health communicators' efficacy in increasing awareness of the shortage of organ and health donors. Using the Situational Theory of Problem Solving (STOPS), we segmented the general population into more meaningful subgroups (e.g., active, aware publics about an organ donation issue) and examined whether segmented public profiles could predict their likelihood of active information giving, taking, and selecting about donor shortage. We also tested whether those publics that are more active about the organ donation issue would recognize and be interested in other organ donation issues (e.g., shortage of bone marrow donors). Findings based on two survey data sets (N = 316 and N = 347) suggested that perceptual and motivation variables could predict the likelihood of information behaviors and further donation-related behavioral intentions. In addition, we found some evidence on the problem chain recognition effect-if one becomes active about an organ donation issue, she or he is likely to perceive similar or related issues as problematic. Based on the findings, we discuss the segmentation method and its utility for more strategic planning and practice of health campaigns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-184
Number of pages14
JournalHealth Communication
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

organ donation
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Health
shortage
Tissue Donors
Strategic planning
health
Bone
communicator
donation
strategic planning
Health Promotion
Motivation
campaign
Bone Marrow
Recognition (Psychology)
Problem Behavior
Population
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

Cite this

Information behaviors and problem chain recognition effect : Applying situational theory of problem solving in organ donation issues. / Kim, Jeong Nam; Shen, Hongmei; Morgan, Susan.

In: Health Communication, Vol. 26, No. 2, 03.2011, p. 171-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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