Influence of gender, race, and education on patient preferences and receipt of cardiac catheterizations among coronary care unit patients

Alison D. Schecter, Pascal Goldschmidt-Clermont, Glenda McKee, Donna Hoffeld, Mary Myers, Roseann Velez, Julieta Duran, Steven P. Schulman, Nisha G. Chandra, Daniel E. Ford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The extent to which a preference for less aggressive care explains the lower rate of invasive cardiac services for women and African-Americans is unknown. A prospective observational study of 272 patients admitted to the coronary care unit was conducted at a tertiary referral teaching hospital and a community teaching hospital. In stepwise multivariate analysis, having less than a college education, poor cardiac function, not having undergone a previous cardiac catheterization, being a patient in a nonreferral community hospital, and current smoking were positively associated with a patient's stating that he or she would disagree with a physician's recommendation for a cardiac catheterization. The stepwise multivariate model with cardiac catheterization as the dependent variable indicated that being a patient in a referral medical center, patient willingness to accept a physician's recommendation for a cardiac catheterization, severe heart disease, and having attended high school were predictive. Women did not differ from men in their preference for or receipt of cardiac catheterization. Patients in the coronary care unit with lower levels of education were less likely to undergo cardiac catheterization. This association was only partly explained by less educated patients' being less willing to accept a physician's recommendation to undergo cardiac catheterization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)996-1001
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume78
Issue number9
StatePublished - Dec 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Coronary Care Units
Patient Preference
Patient Education
Cardiac Catheterization
Community Hospital
Physicians
Teaching Hospitals
Education
Tertiary Care Centers
African Americans
Observational Studies
Heart Diseases
Referral and Consultation
Multivariate Analysis
Smoking
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Schecter, A. D., Goldschmidt-Clermont, P., McKee, G., Hoffeld, D., Myers, M., Velez, R., ... Ford, D. E. (1996). Influence of gender, race, and education on patient preferences and receipt of cardiac catheterizations among coronary care unit patients. American Journal of Cardiology, 78(9), 996-1001.

Influence of gender, race, and education on patient preferences and receipt of cardiac catheterizations among coronary care unit patients. / Schecter, Alison D.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal; McKee, Glenda; Hoffeld, Donna; Myers, Mary; Velez, Roseann; Duran, Julieta; Schulman, Steven P.; Chandra, Nisha G.; Ford, Daniel E.

In: American Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 78, No. 9, 01.12.1996, p. 996-1001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schecter, AD, Goldschmidt-Clermont, P, McKee, G, Hoffeld, D, Myers, M, Velez, R, Duran, J, Schulman, SP, Chandra, NG & Ford, DE 1996, 'Influence of gender, race, and education on patient preferences and receipt of cardiac catheterizations among coronary care unit patients', American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 78, no. 9, pp. 996-1001.
Schecter, Alison D. ; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal ; McKee, Glenda ; Hoffeld, Donna ; Myers, Mary ; Velez, Roseann ; Duran, Julieta ; Schulman, Steven P. ; Chandra, Nisha G. ; Ford, Daniel E. / Influence of gender, race, and education on patient preferences and receipt of cardiac catheterizations among coronary care unit patients. In: American Journal of Cardiology. 1996 ; Vol. 78, No. 9. pp. 996-1001.
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