Influence of age and previous diet of Anopheles gambiae on the infectivity of natural Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes from human volunteers

Bernard A. Okech, Louis C. Gouagna, Ephantus W. Kabiru, John C. Beier, Guiyun Yan, John I. Githure

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of age and dietary factors of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae) on the infectivity of natural Plasmodium falciparum parasites was studied. Mosquitoes of various ages (1-3, 4-7 and 8-11 day old) and those fed blood (either single or double meals) and sugar meals were experimentally co-infected with P. falciparum gametocytes obtained from different naturally infected human volunteers. On day 7, midguts were examined for oocyst infection to determine whether mosquito age or diets have significant effects on parasite infectivity. The age of the mosquitoes did not significantly influence the oocyst infection rates (χ2 = 48.32, df = 40, P = 0.172) or oocyst load (# of oocysts/midgut) (P = 0.14) observed. Oocyst load between groups was not significantly different. Similarly, the type of diet (either blood or sugar) did not influence oocyst infection rates (χ2 = 16.52, df = 19, P = 0.622). However, an increase in oocyst infection rates resulted after previous feeding on double blood meals (35%) compared to single blood meals (25%), with comparable oocyst load. These observations are in agreement with those reported in previous studies suggesting that increased mosquito nutritional reserves resulting from increased dietary resources is favorable for malaria infectivity. This field-based study indicates that vector competence of An. gambiae to natural P. falciparum parasites does not vary with age and that nutritional resources acquired prior to an infectious blood meal plays a crucial role in mosquito-parasite relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Insect Science
Volume4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 22 2004

Keywords

  • An. gambiae
  • Blood and sugar feeding
  • Malaria infectivty
  • Mosquito age
  • Oocysts
  • P. falciparum
  • Sporogony

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Influence of age and previous diet of Anopheles gambiae on the infectivity of natural Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes from human volunteers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this