Inflammatory changes in ruptured canine cranial and human anterior cruciate ligaments

Jennifer G. Barrett, Zhengling Hao, Benjamin K. Graf, Lee Kaplan, John P. Heiner, Peter Muir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To compare expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K and histologic changes in canine cranial cruciate ligaments (CCLs) and human anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs). Study population - Sections of cruciate ligaments from 15 dogs with ruptured CCLs, 8 aged dogs with intact CCLs, 14 human beings with ruptured ACLs, and 11 aged human beings with intact ACLs. Procedure - The CCLs and ACLs were evaluated histologically, and cells containing TRAP and cathepsin K were identified histochemically and immunohistochemically, respectively. Results - The proportion of ruptured CCLs that contained TRAP+ cells was significantly higher than the proportion of intact ACLs that did but similar to proportions of intact CCLs and ruptured ACLs that did. The proportion of ruptured CCLs that contained cathepsin K+ cells was significantly increased, compared with all other groups. Numbers of TRAP+ and cathepsin K+ cells were significantly increased in ruptured CCLs, compared with intact ACLs. The presence of TRAP+ cells was correlated with inflammatory changes, which were most prominent in ruptured CCLs. Conclusion and clinical relevance - Results suggest that synovial macrophage-like cells that produce TRAP are an important feature of the inflammation associated with CCL rupture in dogs. Identification of TRAP and cathepsin K in intact CCLs and ACLs from aged dogs suggests that these enzymes have a functional role in cruciate ligament remodeling and repair. We hypothesize that recruitment and activation of TRAP+ macrophage-like cells into the stifle joint synovium and CCL epiligament are critical features of the inflammatory arthritis that promotes progressive degradation and eventual rupture of the CCL in dogs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2073-2080
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume66
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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anterior cruciate ligament
cranial cruciate ligament
Anterior Cruciate Ligament
Canidae
cathepsin K
acid phosphatase
dogs
Cathepsin K
cells
Dogs
ligaments
macrophages
Ligaments
arthritis
Rupture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Inflammatory changes in ruptured canine cranial and human anterior cruciate ligaments. / Barrett, Jennifer G.; Hao, Zhengling; Graf, Benjamin K.; Kaplan, Lee; Heiner, John P.; Muir, Peter.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 66, No. 12, 01.12.2005, p. 2073-2080.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barrett, Jennifer G. ; Hao, Zhengling ; Graf, Benjamin K. ; Kaplan, Lee ; Heiner, John P. ; Muir, Peter. / Inflammatory changes in ruptured canine cranial and human anterior cruciate ligaments. In: American Journal of Veterinary Research. 2005 ; Vol. 66, No. 12. pp. 2073-2080.
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