Infectious burden and cognitive function: The Northern Manhattan Study

Mira Katan, Yeseon Park Moon, Myunghee Cho Paik, Ralph L Sacco, Clinton B Wright, Mitchell S V Elkind

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We hypothesized that infectious burden (IB), a composite serologic measure of exposure to common pathogens (i.e., Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus 1 and 2) associated with vascular risk in the prospective Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS), would also be associated with cognition. Methods: Cognition was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) at enrollment and the modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status (TICS-m) at annual follow-up visits. Adjusted linear and logistic regressions were used to measure the association between IB index and MMSE. Generalized estimating equation models were used to evaluate associations with TICS-m and its change over time. Results: Serologies and cognitive assessments were available in 1,625 participants of the NOMAS cohort. In unadjusted analyses, higher IB index was associated with worse cognition (change per standard deviation [SD] of IB for MMSE was 20.77, p < 0.0001, and for first measurements of TICS-m was 21.89, p < 0.0001). These effects were attenuated after adjusting for risk factors (for MMSE adjusted change per SD of IB = 20.17, p = 0.06, for TICS-m adjusted change per SD IB = 20.68, p < 0.0001). IB was associated with MMSE ≤24 (compared to MMSE >24, adjusted odds ratio 1.26 per SD of IB, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.51). IB was not associated with cognitive decline over time. The results were similar when IB was limited to viral serologies only. Conclusion: A measure of IB associated with stroke risk and atherosclerosis was independently associated with cognitive performance in this multiethnic cohort. Past infections may contribute to cognitive impairment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1209-1215
Number of pages7
JournalNeurology
Volume80
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 26 2013

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Cognition
Serology
Chlamydophila pneumoniae
Human Herpesvirus 2
Human Herpesvirus 1
Cytomegalovirus
Helicobacter pylori
Blood Vessels
Linear Models
Atherosclerosis
Cohort Studies
Logistic Models
Stroke
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Interviews
Infection
Cognitive Function
Manhattan
Burden

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Katan, M., Moon, Y. P., Paik, M. C., Sacco, R. L., Wright, C. B., & Elkind, M. S. V. (2013). Infectious burden and cognitive function: The Northern Manhattan Study. Neurology, 80(13), 1209-1215. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182896e79

Infectious burden and cognitive function : The Northern Manhattan Study. / Katan, Mira; Moon, Yeseon Park; Paik, Myunghee Cho; Sacco, Ralph L; Wright, Clinton B; Elkind, Mitchell S V.

In: Neurology, Vol. 80, No. 13, 26.03.2013, p. 1209-1215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Katan, M, Moon, YP, Paik, MC, Sacco, RL, Wright, CB & Elkind, MSV 2013, 'Infectious burden and cognitive function: The Northern Manhattan Study', Neurology, vol. 80, no. 13, pp. 1209-1215. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e3182896e79
Katan, Mira ; Moon, Yeseon Park ; Paik, Myunghee Cho ; Sacco, Ralph L ; Wright, Clinton B ; Elkind, Mitchell S V. / Infectious burden and cognitive function : The Northern Manhattan Study. In: Neurology. 2013 ; Vol. 80, No. 13. pp. 1209-1215.
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