Infection of human pericytes by HIV-1 disrupts the integrity of the blood-brain barrier

Shinsuke Nakagawa, Victor Castro, Michal J Toborek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of the central nervous system (CNS) affects cross-talk between the individual cell types of the neurovascular unit, which then contributes to disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the development of neurological dysfunctions. Although the toxicity of HIV-1 on neurons, astrocytes and brain endothelial cells has been widely studied, there are no reports addressing the influence of HIV-1 on pericytes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether or not pericytes can be infected with HIV-1 and how such an infection affects the barrier function of brain endothelial cells. Our results indicate that human brain pericytes express the major HIV-1 receptor CD4 and co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. We also determined that HIV-1 can replicate, although at a low level, in human brain pericytes as detected by HIV-1 p24 ELISA. Pericytes were susceptible to infection with both the X4-tropic NL4-3 and R5-tropic JR-CSF HIV-1 strains. Moreover, HIV-1 infection of pericytes resulted in compromised integrity of an in vitro model of the BBB. These findings indicate that human brain pericytes can be infected with HIV-1 and suggest that infected pericytes are involved in the progression of HIV-1-induced CNS damage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2950-2957
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Volume16
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

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Pericytes
Blood-Brain Barrier
HIV-1
Infection
Brain
Virus Diseases
Central Nervous System
Endothelial Cells
Virus Receptors
CD4 Antigens
Astrocytes
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

Keywords

  • Blood-brain barrier
  • HIV-1
  • Neurovascular unit
  • Pericytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Infection of human pericytes by HIV-1 disrupts the integrity of the blood-brain barrier. / Nakagawa, Shinsuke; Castro, Victor; Toborek, Michal J.

In: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Vol. 16, No. 12, 01.12.2012, p. 2950-2957.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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