Infantile Myofibromatosis: A Nontraumatic Cause of Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy

Travis S. Tierney, Brent J. Tierney, Andrew Rosenberg, Kalpathy S. Krishnamoorthy, William E. Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most injuries to the neonatal brachial plexus occur acutely at birth, and are iatrogenic in origin. However, when weakness is accompanied by atrophy, nontraumatic etiologies should be considered. The differential diagnosis of chronic congenital brachial plexopathy includes cervical bone malformations, humeral osteomyelitis, varicella, and compression from various types of infantile tumors. An illustrative male infant delivered at 37 weeks of gestation with wasted musculature of the left upper arm, ipsilateral Horner's syndrome, and a hemidiaphragm is presented. On further examination, this patient manifested an underlying cervical tumor compressing the brachial plexus. Diagnostic steps leading to the pathologic identification of a solitary cervical myofibroma included physical examination, electromyography, radiographic imaging, and open biopsy. This report emphasizes the importance of differentiating acute from chronic congenital plexus palsy and of recognizing the possibility that infection or neoplasm may underlie the latter.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)276-278
Number of pages3
JournalPediatric Neurology
Volume39
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Brachial Plexus
Paralysis
Myofibroma
Brachial Plexus Neuropathies
Horner Syndrome
Neoplasms
Chickenpox
Electromyography
Osteomyelitis
Physical Examination
Atrophy
Arm
Differential Diagnosis
Parturition
Biopsy
Bone and Bones
Pregnancy
Wounds and Injuries
Infection
Congenital Generalized Fibromatosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Infantile Myofibromatosis : A Nontraumatic Cause of Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy. / Tierney, Travis S.; Tierney, Brent J.; Rosenberg, Andrew; Krishnamoorthy, Kalpathy S.; Butler, William E.

In: Pediatric Neurology, Vol. 39, No. 4, 01.10.2008, p. 276-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tierney, Travis S. ; Tierney, Brent J. ; Rosenberg, Andrew ; Krishnamoorthy, Kalpathy S. ; Butler, William E. / Infantile Myofibromatosis : A Nontraumatic Cause of Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy. In: Pediatric Neurology. 2008 ; Vol. 39, No. 4. pp. 276-278.
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