Individuals with migraine have a different dry eye symptom profile than individuals without migraine

Monika Farhangi, Ryan J. Diel, Dawn C. Buse, Amy Michelle Huang, Roy C Levitt, Konstantinos D. Sarantopoulos, Elizabeth Felix, Anat Galor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Many individuals with migraine report symptoms of dry eye (DE). However, it is not known whether DE profiles are similar between individuals with and without migraine. To bridge this gap, we evaluated symptoms and signs of DE, including symptoms suggestive of nerve dysfunction, in a large group of individuals with DE symptoms, and compared profiles between individuals with migraine and those without migraine or headache. Methods: Prospective cross-sectional study of individuals with DE symptoms seen at the Miami VA. Results: Of 250 individuals, 31 met International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria for migraine based on a validated screen. Individuals with migraine were significantly younger (57 vs 62 years) and more likely to be female (26% vs 6%) than controls. Individuals with migraine had more severe DE symptoms and ocular pain compared with controls (mean Ocular Surface Disease Index 53.93 ± 21.76 vs 36.30 ± 22.90, p=0.0001; mean Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory modified for the Eye 39.39 ± 23.33 vs 21.86 ± 20.17, p=0.0001). The difference in symptom profile occurred despite similar ocular surface parameters between the groups. Conclusions: Individuals with migraine had a different DE symptom yet a similar DE sign profile when compared with controls without migraine. This suggests that DE symptoms in individuals with migraine may be driven by nerve dysfunction as opposed to ocular surface abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBritish Journal of Ophthalmology
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Migraine Disorders
Eye Pain
Eye Abnormalities
Headache Disorders
Eye Diseases
Neuralgia
Signs and Symptoms
Cross-Sectional Studies
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • ocular surface
  • tears

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Individuals with migraine have a different dry eye symptom profile than individuals without migraine. / Farhangi, Monika; Diel, Ryan J.; Buse, Dawn C.; Huang, Amy Michelle; Levitt, Roy C; Sarantopoulos, Konstantinos D.; Felix, Elizabeth; Galor, Anat.

In: British Journal of Ophthalmology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d37752a90bbf46f5a17f1cf9ed546da8,
title = "Individuals with migraine have a different dry eye symptom profile than individuals without migraine",
abstract = "Background: Many individuals with migraine report symptoms of dry eye (DE). However, it is not known whether DE profiles are similar between individuals with and without migraine. To bridge this gap, we evaluated symptoms and signs of DE, including symptoms suggestive of nerve dysfunction, in a large group of individuals with DE symptoms, and compared profiles between individuals with migraine and those without migraine or headache. Methods: Prospective cross-sectional study of individuals with DE symptoms seen at the Miami VA. Results: Of 250 individuals, 31 met International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria for migraine based on a validated screen. Individuals with migraine were significantly younger (57 vs 62 years) and more likely to be female (26{\%} vs 6{\%}) than controls. Individuals with migraine had more severe DE symptoms and ocular pain compared with controls (mean Ocular Surface Disease Index 53.93 ± 21.76 vs 36.30 ± 22.90, p=0.0001; mean Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory modified for the Eye 39.39 ± 23.33 vs 21.86 ± 20.17, p=0.0001). The difference in symptom profile occurred despite similar ocular surface parameters between the groups. Conclusions: Individuals with migraine had a different DE symptom yet a similar DE sign profile when compared with controls without migraine. This suggests that DE symptoms in individuals with migraine may be driven by nerve dysfunction as opposed to ocular surface abnormalities.",
keywords = "epidemiology, ocular surface, tears",
author = "Monika Farhangi and Diel, {Ryan J.} and Buse, {Dawn C.} and Huang, {Amy Michelle} and Levitt, {Roy C} and Sarantopoulos, {Konstantinos D.} and Elizabeth Felix and Anat Galor",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1136/bjophthalmol-2018-313471",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "British Journal of Ophthalmology",
issn = "0007-1161",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Individuals with migraine have a different dry eye symptom profile than individuals without migraine

AU - Farhangi, Monika

AU - Diel, Ryan J.

AU - Buse, Dawn C.

AU - Huang, Amy Michelle

AU - Levitt, Roy C

AU - Sarantopoulos, Konstantinos D.

AU - Felix, Elizabeth

AU - Galor, Anat

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Many individuals with migraine report symptoms of dry eye (DE). However, it is not known whether DE profiles are similar between individuals with and without migraine. To bridge this gap, we evaluated symptoms and signs of DE, including symptoms suggestive of nerve dysfunction, in a large group of individuals with DE symptoms, and compared profiles between individuals with migraine and those without migraine or headache. Methods: Prospective cross-sectional study of individuals with DE symptoms seen at the Miami VA. Results: Of 250 individuals, 31 met International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria for migraine based on a validated screen. Individuals with migraine were significantly younger (57 vs 62 years) and more likely to be female (26% vs 6%) than controls. Individuals with migraine had more severe DE symptoms and ocular pain compared with controls (mean Ocular Surface Disease Index 53.93 ± 21.76 vs 36.30 ± 22.90, p=0.0001; mean Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory modified for the Eye 39.39 ± 23.33 vs 21.86 ± 20.17, p=0.0001). The difference in symptom profile occurred despite similar ocular surface parameters between the groups. Conclusions: Individuals with migraine had a different DE symptom yet a similar DE sign profile when compared with controls without migraine. This suggests that DE symptoms in individuals with migraine may be driven by nerve dysfunction as opposed to ocular surface abnormalities.

AB - Background: Many individuals with migraine report symptoms of dry eye (DE). However, it is not known whether DE profiles are similar between individuals with and without migraine. To bridge this gap, we evaluated symptoms and signs of DE, including symptoms suggestive of nerve dysfunction, in a large group of individuals with DE symptoms, and compared profiles between individuals with migraine and those without migraine or headache. Methods: Prospective cross-sectional study of individuals with DE symptoms seen at the Miami VA. Results: Of 250 individuals, 31 met International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria for migraine based on a validated screen. Individuals with migraine were significantly younger (57 vs 62 years) and more likely to be female (26% vs 6%) than controls. Individuals with migraine had more severe DE symptoms and ocular pain compared with controls (mean Ocular Surface Disease Index 53.93 ± 21.76 vs 36.30 ± 22.90, p=0.0001; mean Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory modified for the Eye 39.39 ± 23.33 vs 21.86 ± 20.17, p=0.0001). The difference in symptom profile occurred despite similar ocular surface parameters between the groups. Conclusions: Individuals with migraine had a different DE symptom yet a similar DE sign profile when compared with controls without migraine. This suggests that DE symptoms in individuals with migraine may be driven by nerve dysfunction as opposed to ocular surface abnormalities.

KW - epidemiology

KW - ocular surface

KW - tears

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065250359&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85065250359&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2018-313471

DO - 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2018-313471

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85065250359

JO - British Journal of Ophthalmology

JF - British Journal of Ophthalmology

SN - 0007-1161

ER -